Archive for Bob Gibson

The Home Run King and 4 other HOF autos for $25

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , on February 18, 2011 by Cardboard Icons

It’s not hard to find hall of fame signatures on cards these days.  The price of these autographs has been dropping over the years, partly because collectors have so many different ones to choose from.

But fact remains: If you can get them at a budget price, you’ve got yourself a nice little collectible.

Over the last 10 days, I’ve acquired five hall of fame signatures for the low price of $25.

They may not be the most sought after cards of these players, but they are what they are — autographed.

The Hank Aaron shown at the top of this post is from a special 1992 Front Row set.  Some 25,000 sets were created, but 5,000 of them featured a card that was signed by The Hammer.  Problem is though that the cards are not certified.  Before paying $17 for this Aaron I compared it to others that have been slabbed by PSA/DNA and it looks to have the same characteristics.  I have no problem believing this is the real deal.  What I like about this Aaron is that it comes from 1992, a time when Aaron signatures were still relatively smooth.  Look at any of his newer autos, most of them are pretty jittery.

Before finding this Aaron auto, I found a lot of four 1994 Nabisco autographs for less than the price of three 2011 Topps packs.  Nabisco?  As in the cracker company?  Yep.

In 1994, the cookie, cracker and biscuit manufacturer created a four-card set that was part of a giveaway.  In a nutshell, purchasers sent in a few bar codes from Nabisco products along with the cost of shipping and handling, and in return they received ONE hall of fame autograph. I managed to get the whole set for about the same price someone paid for shipping and handling on one card. Awesome.

Duke Snider is a common signature to get through the mail (just add like $10) and he’ll sign whatever you send him.  But it’s nice to have a signature from the early 1990s, one that is not as shaky as his latest returns have been.

Jim Palmer autos can be had for $15 these days, but most of them are on shiny stickers that were produced by Donruss in the early part of the 2000s.  Hard-signed autos are always a plus.

Frank Robinson’s signature might be one of the most awkward looking legible signatures on the market.  I think his autos are more desirable on Reds cards, but there’s no complaining with this hard-signed card.

Gotta love a signature from Bob Gibson.  He was one of the most intimidating pitchers in the history of the game, yet has one of the most gentle signatures.

A sneak peak into my on-going project

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , on October 28, 2010 by Cardboard Icons

For the last several weeks, I’ve been putting my non-graded/slabbed rookie cards into binder pages. I’ll have an announcement coming in a few weeks regarding this, but here’s a few images of one of the binders.


Rookie cards of two of the baddest pitchers on the planet

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , on October 25, 2010 by Cardboard Icons

Bob Feller and Bob Gibson are probably two of the hardest throwing right-handed pitchers in the history of the game. And their rookies cards proved to be two of the hardest ones for me to add to my rookie collection. Not because they are hard to find … but because I am cheap.

Typically, 1959 Topps Bob Gibson rookies sell for no less than $50 in any condition — at least that’s what they are when ever I go looking for them. And 1948 Bowman Bob Feller rookies are usually in the same ball park.

True, they are not mint. But does this matter to me? Have you not been reading my stuff? What the condition of these cards allowed me to do was add them to my Rookie Card Collection for about the price that one would have cost me. Plus, the Feller will look great with my 1948 Bowman Yogi Berra rookie.

 

Card of the Day: 1969 Topps Bob Gibson World Series Highlight

Posted in Card of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

1969toppsbobgibsonfrontEver since the MLB Network went live in January, it seems as if a night doesn’t go by without there being some reference to Bob Gibson, the great Cardinals pitcher. Most recently, it seems the network has been running on a loop the highlights of the 1968 World Series, the Fall Classic that featured Bob Gibson and the Cardinals against Al Kaline and the Detroit Tigers. In Game One, Gibson struck out a record 17 hitters.

About two weeks ago, while wasting time on eBay, I stumbled upon this beautiful little card that commemorates that performance. The cost: $1. Truthfully, this thing isn’t worth much; Beckett has it listed at $8 and if you really wanted one, I’m sure you could find one for the same price I bought my copy. But as it turns out, this is my first vintage Bob Gibson card. I’m still aiming to add his 1959 Topps rookie to my collection, but I’m not going to be doing that any time soon. For the time being, this card will have to do.

As a side note, this card has a story to go with it. I actually forgot about this card after I paid for it. And I did not remember it until the seller contacted me apologizing for delayed shipping. The reason: She was busy helping her brother move out of Arkansas where tornadoes recently hit. Continue reading

Card of the Day: 2004 Topps Postseason Highlights Aaron Boone

Posted in Card of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 15, 2008 by Cardboard Icons

I’m going to cheat a bit here and double dip. I wrote the following piece for my other blog and felt it was worth sharing here as well. Enjoy.

I can’t help it. Every time I see Tim Wakefield, I think of 2003. I think of Aaron Boone. I think of a floating knuckle ball that never hits the catcher’s mitt. I think of lost dreams and heartbreak. And I know I can’t be the only one. Boston fans have had much to cheer about since 2004, but you can’t tell me that all is well in your in mind when you see Terry Francona send Wakefield to the hill every fifth day. You can’t tell me that disaster is not the first thing on your mind. Continue reading

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