Archive for t206

Instagram Portrait: 1909-11 T206 Walter Johnson / 2010 Topps Chrome Refractor Autographs Stephen Strasburg

Posted in Instagram Portraits with tags , , , , , , , on July 26, 2012 by Cardboard Icons

“We’ve come a long way …”

Cardboard Porn: 1909-1911 T206 Ty Cobb (Red Port.)

Posted in Cardboard Porn with tags , , , , , , , , on July 22, 2010 by Cardboard Icons

Cardboard Porn: Because sometimes words just get in the way.

This is the 10th in an on-going series of card images titled “Cardboard Porn.”

Forget 2009 Topps 206, let’s see the real thing!

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 9, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

I’ve been on a binge lately with 2009 Topps 206. The reason I love these cards so much is because they remind me of the real deal for 100 years ago.

Fortunately, I own two copies of the original cards, two of the biggest stars of the period, Christy Mathewson and Nap LaJoie. I received these cards back from Beckett Grading on Tuesday and they are even nicer than they were two weeks ago when I cracked them from their less-superior PSA and SGC cases. The Mathewson is a Sweet Caporal back while the LaJoie features the more common Piedmont back, a design Topps used for the common backs for its 2009 minis. I do have a question for Topps though: Is the company looking to produce this set again in 2010? The original T-206s were distributed in 1909 AND 1911.

I just hit for the Cycle with 2009 Topps 206

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , on December 8, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

I can’t stay away from 2009 Topps 206 retail packs. Searched or not, I find myself drawn to those blue wrappers like a piece of metal to a magnet. It’s almost masochistic at this point because I know there is almost a 99 percent chance that I will not pull a relic. What I keep telling myself is that those blue and black framed beauties are not my reason for buying these cards. And to an extent I am being truthful. The reason I am drawn to these cards is because of the minis — they resemble cards that are a century old, and for the most part they look pretty good. But what sucks is that the  and relics are minis, too, only set inside colored frames which are easy for searchers to spot. Bastards.

I digress. Knowing all this, I still bought a few packs the other day and managed to do well with the minis. So well, in fact, that I hit for the cycle: got four different mini backs in just a few packs. The Piedmont backs may be the most common, but I think they may be my favorite. I really like the Polar Bear (1:10 packs) , the Old Mill (1:20) are so-so and the Cycle backs (/99) are serial numbered. But the Piedmont backs are a thing of art — they look exactly like the cards from a century ago

Which one is your favorite?

Ken Griffey Jr.’s 2009 Topps 206 card is U-G-L-Y

Posted in Box / Pack Break with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 7, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

Purchased a few more 2009 Topps 206  retail packs on Monday and pulled a mini of Ken Griffey Jr.  Is this really the best that Topps could have done for this veteran; a card of him looking like a huge blob? Seriously, given that this set is sort of  art-based, I think there were some real opportunities. Maybe Topps could have given us another Griffey card featuring that pretty swing, or give us a throw back of him climbing the wall like Spiderman. But to put out a card that looks like this is almost a slap in the face. I don’t care if he was an Upper Deck autograph exclusive his entire career, Griffey deserves better than this heaping pile of garbage.

The rest of the five packs break was so-so. No shortprint minis, no short print base cards, but I did wind up with a relic: Chipper Jones Old Mill (1:254 packs) border jersey card. It also should be noted that I pulled another Trevor Cahill mini (Piedmont) and it appears that Topps just screwed up all of the Cahill minis as this one also features the back intended for Josh Whitesell.

Topps 206 Retail is LIVE! (error alert)

Posted in Box / Pack Break, Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , on December 4, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

Finally found some retail 2009 Topps 206 at Target (H/T A Cardboard Problem, via Twitter), picked up three packs from two searched boxes. Nothing major from the packs, the standard amount of base cards, three thick gold border parallels and three minis, including a Polar Bear back, which are seeded 1:10 packs.

The Jimmie Foxx mini pictured to the right is a Piedmont (common) back and was the first mini I pulled. I LOVE minis of retired players. That is why I went gaga over 2008 Allen and Ginter — I adored the Baseball Icons set, which I am still working on, by the way. The only bad thing about this Foxx: He’s shown as a Philadelphia Athletic and not a Boston Red Sox.  Oh well.

The first thing I noticed about the card was that it was stained on the back. As it turns out, Topps added the staining on every card to give it an authentic tobacco feel. I thought someone really spit on it. (check out the shoddy video break here) Anyway, kind of a neat idea. I dig it.

The other two minis I pulled were of Josh Whitesell (Piedmont) and Trevor Cahill (Polar Bear). When I went to scan the cards, I realized that the Cahill was an error. First I noticed that they had Cahill listed as a D-Backs player, then seconds later I noticed it had the same card number (289)  as the Josh Whitesell, who actually does play for Arizona. Looks like Topps got the backs screwed up on these two cards. Kind of ironic that out of three packs I end up with these two. Anyway, has anyone else noticed this? I wonder if the error was corrected.

Cahill (Polar Back) is an error

Yes, Houston Collector, you can have this card. (it's the chunky parallel)

Aside from the minis, this product is rather ho-hum for me. The design (front) is exactly the same as the 2002(?) Topps 206 set, so that is somewhat disappointing. But I understand there’s not a lot of wiggle room when you’re re-creating a set like this. Not when you’re honoring the 100-year anniversary. I very much dislike the gold chunk parallel cards, although they are better than a blank deterrent card. And the card backs are rather ugly, in my opinion.

As far as the base cards I pulled, I’m happy to have ended up with two Red Sox cards. And  I enjoy the cards of Kenji Johjima (jailhouse pose) and Fausto Carmona (whose got his eyes closed). Find the cards of Chicago players Mike Fontenot and Alex Rios amusing (looks like the flames of Hell behind them). And The Jay Bruce is pretty solid, although I feel like I’ve seen this pose 52 times already. Go figure.

What I can’t figure out is why Topps decided to add “American League”  and “National League” on the back of some of the cards, yet left it off of others. Hmm.

Card of the Day: 1909-11 T-206 Piedmont Nap Lajoie

Posted in Card of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2008 by Cardboard Icons

During my seven week hiatus I acquired only two cards, and both of them are almost 100 years old. The first I’ll discuss is this 1909-11 T206 Piedmont Nap Lajoie. Widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, Lajoie played nearly 2,500 career games over 21 years, carried a career average of .338 and collected more than 3,200 hits. He also drove in 1,599 runs while slugging only 84 total homers.

I caught this card on eBay about six weeks ago while reading the first half of “Cobb.” It didn’t cost me much to add this to my collection, a mere $60 (the price of a Billy Butler Bowman Chrome auto rookie) was all it took to add this century-old classic to by display case. And while the condition leaves much to be desired, the mere presence of this card adds a new dimension to my collection, and has made me rethink my focus again. Continue reading

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