Rare, non-serial numbered parallels get lost in the shuffle

As a player collector, it’s fun (sometimes) to chase down parallels. In most Topps brands, we can expect there to be some sort of gold parallel and then of course a refractor and variations thereof. Sometimes those cards are serial numbered to match the year, or much lower, say to 5, 10, 25, etc.

But in Stadium Club, Topps has gotten back to an early parallel called “First Day Issue” … and they’re rare, but often forgotten about because they’re not serial numbered.

Topps began releasing the First Day parallels in the early 1990s, and those parallels initially had a holographic logo emblazoned on the front of what looked like a base card. And then in the late 1990s the company moved to a a gold foil logo. The idea — at least in my mind — was to signify a certain batch of cards that were made during the first run the product and then inserted as a parallel of the base card.

In the last half decade or so, Topps brought the parallel back and made them much tougher to pull. And much like the late 1990s Topps used a foil emblem on the front to signify this parallel. Pretty cool, right? One problem: The cards are supposedly limited to like seven copies and they’re not serial numbered.

This means sellers may not know what they actually have, so they may not bother listing them, so they’re missing an opportunity to make money.

But on the flip side, player collectors tend to get them cheaper than other rare parallels solely because they’re not serial numbered.

I hope that when Topps releases Stadium Club in the upcoming months that the First Day Issue returns, and that they are rare, and I hope they begin serial numbering them … even if it means I’ll be paying more for the latest Kershaw.

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