Archive for the Hall of Fame Rookie Cards Category

Baseball Hall of Fame `Class of 2019′ in rookie cards

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

For the first time in several years I’ve been excited to see the announcement of the newest class of Cooperstown. I’m not going to dwell on the fact that my guy, Roger Clemens, still didn’t make it — although I appreciate that he is trending upward.

That said, Tuesday afternoon it was announced that Yankees closer Mariano Rivera was the first unanimous selection to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and joining him in the Class of 2019 are pitchers Mike Mussina and Roy Halladay, and designated hitter Edgar Martinez. Those four players were elected by the Baseball Writers of America and join the previously announced closer Lee Smith and Designated Hitter Harold Baines who were elected to the Hall in December by committee vote.

I’m a Red Sox fan and I cannot deny the greatness of Mariano. While I hated seeing him close out games against my team, I appreciated his pure dominance. And he was humble and emotional at the same time. One of my favorite scenes is watching him crumble on the mound after winning one of his first World Series titles. I’m proud to say I own a BGS Mint 9 copy of his 1992 Bowman rookie card. Also, one of my favorite inserts in my collection is his 1997 Bowman Best International Preview Atomic Refractor.

Mussina is one of the guys I pulled for in 1992, a year after his rookie cards actually hit the market I distinctly remember seeing his 1992 Ultra card — that set was super premium quality at the time — selling for $3 to $5 at my LCS, and remember the first time he was on the cover of Beckett Baseball. Moose was filthy, and it was a joy to watch his career. My favorite of his rookie cards is the 1991 Fleer Ultra Update, which I own in a BGS Mint 9. In terms of inserts, his 1996 Pacific Flame Throwers sticks out in my collection.

“Bad Ass.” That’s how I liked to think of Roy Halladay, both in real life and as a fantasy player. This guy was so fun to watch; and in our fantasy league was a source of controversy as there was at least one guy who thought he was overrated. Nope. Not one bit. One of my favorite memories of Halladay is that no-hitter he threw in Game One of the NLDS. This was four days after my son was born, and I remember sitting at home on the couch with him in my arms when the final pitch was thrown. I was genuinely sad when I learned Roy had died in 2017. I was at work driving around when word started to spread. The only graded rookie card I own of Roy is his 1997 Bowman, BGS Mint 9, which holds a special place in my heart because that 1997 set is the first Bowman set I actually built. I do own a few copies of his Bowman Chrome rookie in raw condition, however it is the International version of that Chrome rookie card that I like to think of when it comes to my favorite inserts or parallels in my collection.

I loved watching Edgar Martinez play, especially on those mid to late 1990s Seattle Mariner teams with when he had other hitters around him like Ken Griffey Jr, Alex Rodriguez and Jay Buhner. The DH position is often shunned in baseball circles, but this dude could hit. I really enjoyed his batting stance and watching him make solid contact with the ball. He has two rookie cards, and only one of them actually pictures him. I have several copies of his 1988 Fleer card, which I sadly do not own in a graded case. It’s shown here in a one touch solely for display purposes. I’ll have to add a Mint 9 or better BGS copy at some point — but I will not overpay for one right now. When it comes to inserts, Edgar’s Elite Series card is the one that catches my eye.

Whether or not you believe Lee Smith or Harold Baines belong in the Hall of Fame, fact remains they are in and were good players. I remember Smith being the closer for the Red Sox just as I was really getting into the sport — and he was dominant. Maybe not Dennis Eckersley dominant, but a stud nonetheless. When I think of Harold Baines I do think of a very good hitter. I LOVED his batting stance and often emulated it in Whiffle Ball games in the parking lot of my apartment complex — I got to watch him a lot in the early 1990s when he played in Oakland. I own a 1982 Topps Lee Smith in BGS Mint 9, and a 1981 Topps Harold Baines in a BGS 6 — which is comical, but was a must-buy when I found it for $2 at the LCS. I’ll probably update at some point.

Congrats to Ken Griffey Jr. and Mike Piazza on their HOF selections — 89 UD, 92 Fleer BGS 9

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, Hall of Famers with tags , , , , on January 6, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

   
 

HOF Rookie Card: 1933 Goudey Carl Hubbell BVG 4

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards with tags , , , , on November 18, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

Perhaps the biggest PC addition to come out of my most-recent COMC Mailday was this 1933 Goudey Carl Hubbell rookie card graded a 4 by Beckett Grading.  

  
The centering is amazing. The back is clean. The surface is fantastic. The price was unbeatable.

Hubbell was a two-time NL MVP, nine-time All Star, a World Series Champion and hurled a no-hitter.  He was elected to the Hall of Fame on his third ballot and has his number 11 retired by the Giants organization.

Welcome home, Mr. Hubbell.

When your LCS has an HOF rookie card you’ve been seeking, you must buy it

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, Hall of Famers with tags , , , on October 24, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

I have an addiction to buying baseball cards.  Yes, I said it.  I had about 40 minutes of free time Saturday while juggling a bunch of family stuff so I utilized every minute I had and made a trip to one of my local card shops, the one that has lots of vintage.

I really wasn’t sure what I was seeking, but I wanted to see a vintage Ted Williams card I almost bought a few weeks ago when I last was there.  During that trip I opted for rookies of Dom DiMaggio and Bobby Doerr instead (Post here). I probably would’ve bought the Williams today, but it was gone and I found something else I wanted.

As soon as a I stepped up to my favorite vintage showcase my eyes locked on a 1933 Goudey Bill Dickey rookie card.

As fate would have it, this was a card I had been seeking for years. Sure, they’d been available on line at various prices and condition.  But I was so happy with my last purchase here that I decided that if I was going to add Dickey to my collection, this was the perfect way to do it.

  
Big thanks to Stevens Creek Sports Cards in San Jose for stocking a fantastic selection of vintage cards. Buying cards in person is something this hobby seems to lack at times. 

You don’t go to the post office at 6 a.m. for just any card 

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, Hall of Famers, Mail Day with tags , , , , on October 14, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

Yesterday I posted about my 1933 Goudey Jim Bottomley card that arrived in the mail.  There should have been a second card as part of that mail day, but no one was home to sign for it.

So the postman left a note saying so could pick up the item anytime after 6 a.m. the next day.

I was there 15 minutes early.

Behold, perhaps the best looking low grade t206 you may ever see, the newest addition to my collection, a 1909-11 t206 Tris Speaker.

  
One look at this card and you may wonder why it graded a 1.5. The front is drop-dead gorgeous. Fantastic centering and bright colors. Decent corners for a century-old card.

The back is why it graded so low.  But even with the paperloss, the back isn’t that bad and when this thing is in my showcase, no one will be looking at the back.

  

Mail Day: Don’t ship graded cards in PWEs …

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, Hall of Famers, Mail Day with tags , , , , on October 13, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

I was elated to learn via the eBay app that I had received a package in the mail today, one of the vintage grades cards I recently bought off the site.

When I got home I found this … 

  
… A PWE (plain white envelope) containing a rigid item — which was obviously my graded card.

Luckily the case and card are still in good shape.  Honestly, if the case in this instance had been damaged I wouldn’t have been too upset, because the card is headed to Beckett Grading in the near future.

This 1933 Goudey card features Hall of Famer Jim Bottomley in an iconic pose that features Bottomley and his crooked hat.  A must-own rookie card for vintage collectors.  

A trip to LCS for supplies leads to purchase of vintage rookies

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, New Addition with tags , , , , , on September 21, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

So earlier today I was taking pictures of some autographs in my collection and noticed that I still needed about 30 single-screw cases for a project I’m working on.  So I headed to the LCS to buy these …

  
Well, I had about 20 minutes to spare and the shop owner tells me he got a bunch of 1940s and older cards in the showcase. 

So I dug through and saw lots of stuff I liked, but really two cards that I absolutely needed for my collection.

  
For less than the price of a hobby box I added two rookie cards of Boston Red Sox legends to my collection, cards that I had only seen online.  Both are considered lower grade, but I love that these were unexpected purchases made in person and from one of the local shops, which I like supporting. 

(Public Service Announcement: If you’ve got a shop near you, buy a single or two every month for your PC and help keep them in business.)

I only had a few minutes at the shop today because I had to get my kids from school, but I had just enough time afterward to take these Instagram pictures on the baseball field at my kids’ school.

1939 Play Ball Bobby Doerr, who at age 97 is presently the oldest living member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

 And 1941 Play Ball Dom DiMaggio, younger brother of The Yankee Clipper Joe DiMaggio, and a star in his own right.