Archive for the Memory Lane Category

“Hey, I brought the binder…”

Posted in Memory Lane with tags , on December 18, 2020 by Cardboard Icons

About three months ago a co-worker asked if I could evaluate some cards he had since childhood. It’s COVID Time so we did what everyone else does: He shared pictures of what he had.

Only the binder pages were visible, and for the most part the binder had some basketball cards from mid 1990s, but no Jordans and none of the snazzy inserts. I broke the news to him that they weren’t worth but maybe $5-$10. He said I could have them if I wanted. I accepted the verbal invitation, adding I’d give them to my son.

Days turned into weeks, and weeks into months. No cards were brought to work. I’m not the guy who is going to hound anyone for a freebie. Really it was no big deal; it didn’t change my opinion of him at all.

Then today he sees me in the parking lot.

“Hey, I brought the binder!” He says.

We walk to his car and from the back seat he presents me with this classic Topps binder; original crusty Topps branded pages and all.

I geeked out.

“Oh damn, you didn’t tell me it was THAT binder.” I said, overly joyed to be giving this a new home.

The content of the binder hadn’t changed – there was no baseball within. And there were some basketball Hal of fame players so it’s a perfect addition for my son.

But the binder? That is a treasure. It needs to be cleaned up a bit and is usable, but at this point its days are best suited as a display piece. I mean look at all those glorious cards in the cover.

Funny note I added one of these to my collection five years ago after finding it in thrift store for $19.99. (see Thrift Treasures 93).

Thanks, Greg for the awesomeness. It will present will among my collections

Card show bargain bin find brings back a fond memory

Posted in Memory Lane with tags , , , , , on March 10, 2020 by Cardboard Icons

Last week I managed to make it to the first night of the annual GT Sports Marketing show in Santa Clara, California. One of my favorite things to do it dig through the bargain boxes while everyone else is clamoring over the newest, shiny cards in the show cases.

As I dug through one dealer’s dollar box, I stopped dead in my tracks when I came to a stack of Frank Thomas cards because there in my hands was a copy of a card that I honestly called the second best card — second only to my my 1993 Elite Eddie Murray — I had ever pulled to that point in my life.

In 1994, I was a freshman in high school and my parents had been separated for about five years. My father was living with his girlfriend in a city about 15 miles away and on the weekends I would go to his house and spent time fishing and just hanging out. In that small town there was a card shop run by a gentleman who smoked cigars while customers browsed the shelves and showcase.

That year 1994 Score caught my attention because for the first time the brand had created parallel cards (Gold Rush) that were seeded one per pack and at the time that was a big deal. I bought a fair amount of Series One and completed a base set and had a partial set, so when Series Two was released I was excited.

I had no money, but my cousin — who is a year younger than I — had $10 and said I could borrow it if I promised to pay her back. You know I was down for that deal, and so she gave it to me and I plunked the cash down on the counter and asked for nine packs of 1994 Score Series Two — it would have been 10 packs if not for taxes.

I ripped pack after pack and somewhere in the middle of the session came out a 1994 Score “The Cycle” Frank Thomas card. It was one of 20 cards on the checklist, and the cards were seeded 1:72 packs, which was a common ratio for rare inserts of the time. And Frank Thomas was no slouch — his popularity in the hobby was on par with Ken Griffey Jr. at the time; they often traded top positions as the top player on the Beckett Baseball’s monthly hot player list.

When the cards were priced in Beckett, that Thomas — and the Griffey — were listed at $75. The Thomas I owned went right into a four-screw, 1/4-inch screw case for maximum protection — sans penny sleeve of course.

That Thomas stoked a great passion of mine to chase that entire set. I spent much of the fall trading various football rookies — Heath Shuler and Trent Dilfer to be specific — for various cards on the checklist, mostly the lower end guys. Dealers were more than happy to take the hot quarterback rookies for these inserts.

I never did finish the set as a kid, but it is something I have half completed at present time and intend to finish at some point.

Although I already owned a copy of this Frank Thomas card — it’s not available even for $75 — I could not pass on the chance to obtain another at such a low price. It’s not that I needed the card for my collection, but I needed it for my collecting soul and so that I could revisit that story and share it with you.