Archive for 1990 Leaf

Rookie Card Showcase: 1990 Leaf Frank Thomas

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , on December 18, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

This is part 17 of an ongoing series. To see the rest of this series, click here.

Before there was Albert Pujols, there was the Big Hurt Frank Thomas. Laugh all you want, but when Thomas was healthy, there was no better first baseman in the game. He was the game’s premier power hitter, and arguably the greatest hitter (in terms of average) of the early and mid 1990s. Every time he stepped to the plate, he was fixin’ to put a hurtin’ on the other team. His on-field success lead to extreme hobby status and this 1990 Leaf card was THE card to have. In an era where card were produced in the millions (or close to that anyway) the Leaf product of 1990 was considered the elite brand due to its “limited” nature. The Thomas card rivaled the 1989 Upper Deck Ken Griffey Jr. as the best active player rookie card to own at the time; each was being sold in excess of $75 at the time. To put that into perspective, boxes of basic cards like Topps and Donruss were still being sold for about $18 per. Thomas’ career was marred by injury starting in the late 1990s and his hobby status began declining as a result. (it should be noted that Thomas still has plenty of hardcore collectors willing to pay a pretty penny for the extremely rare cards) His Leaf rookie began showing up for discount prices; Gem Mint copies like the one shown here can be had for a little more than $20. That’s a hell of a collectible at a great price if you ask me.

Card of the Day: 1990 Leaf Gary Sheffield

Posted in Card of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 6, 2008 by Cardboard Icons

It’s been 41 years since Major League Baseball celebrated an offensive triple crown. The pitching version has been done a few times since Carl Yastrzemski last tallied the offensive version in 1967, a feat which consists of leading the league in batting average, home runs and RBIs. But it’s not like there’s been a shortage of contenders. in 1992, Gary Sheffield was a serious threat and this 1990 Leaf card was his best at the time. Continue reading