Archive for Boston Red Sox

In Memoriam: Bobby Doerr (April 7, 1918 – Nov. 13, 2017)

Posted in In Memoriam, Misc. with tags , , , , , on November 14, 2017 by Cardboard Icons

1939 Play Ball Bobby Doerr Rookie Card

Target run reminds me WHY I collect

Posted in Box / Pack Break, Misc. with tags , , , , , , on September 2, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

IMG_1614

I made a brief Target run late last night to grab some necessities and made the obligatory stop in the card aisle. There wasn’t anything “new” to buy, but there was a Fairfield repack 20-pack box that intrigued me. There were a handful of 2014 Prizm Draft Picks packs inside, some 2015 Topps Series 2 packs (Think Kris Bryant rookies) and what was clearly two 1991 Stadium Club packs, along with other stuff.

I’ve opened my fair share of 1991 Stadium Club, but I was still feeling nostalgic about cards at the time. You see this week I think I finally got my son into the hobby; earlier in the day we went to the card shop and he had a blast. (*Side note: A big thank you to Kevin at Stevens Creek Sports Cards for the stack of free commons you gave to my son. He loved them.) I digress.

The Prizm packs, the jumbo 2015 Heritage and Topps Series 2 packs seemed to make the box worth the price, but the two 25-year-old packs really set the hook in me.

For the uninitiated, 1991 Stadium Club was quite possibly one of the finest card sets released in it’s time. Sure, we remember 1989 Upper Deck for the premium Ken Griffey Jr. rookie card.  And we recall 1990 Leaf for having another iconic rookie card in Frank Thomas, as well as dozens of other rookie cards of stars from the time. But 1991 Stadium Club was THE premium baseball card. Every card featured full-bleed photographs, gold foil and high gloss that got you high (read:not really, but if you opened this stuff as a kid, the scent is one you’ll never forget. Packs were several dollars each upon release and star cards — not rookies — were in high demand. Griffey and Thomas were each well over $20 for a while.

My guy at the time was Roger Clemens, the flame-throwing perennial Cy Young award candidate. I couldn’t afford these packs when I was a kid, but I distinctly asking my dad for $5 and then riding three miles on my bike to the local card shop to buy one card — the Roger Clemens 1991 Stadium Club that had been sitting in the show case of Brian’s Books  in Santa Clara, Calif.

Flash forward to last night.  I worked late and then made said Target run.  When I got home I took the above photo, opened all of the packs save for two — the 1991 Stadium Club. Whatever lurked inside these packs was surely worth nothing more than a few pennies. But the nostalgia is everything and that can be priceless. I tore opened the first pack, flipped card by card and then it happened — the second last card:

IMG_1623

There is Clemens is all his glory. That pose. That glove. That spring training uniform. Just like I remember it. True, I could probably get a brick of 500 of this exact card for like $10 because no one cares about him or this card anymore, but none of those would be as valuable as just this one card, for at last I had pulled something I could only dream of as a kid.

Someone asked me recently: WHY do you collect baseball cards?

This is why.

It’s not really about the money. It’s not really an investment because cards rarely appreciate with time under normal circumstances.

It’s about the memories. It’s about how in an instant single worthless card can transport you back a quarter of a century to the moment when you asked a parent for money and trekked clear across town to buy a card of your childhood sports hero.

I have other reasons for collecting what I do. And sometimes I can’t fully explain it. But THIS is probably the strongest reason why.

Rookie Card Upgrade: 1972 Topps Carlton Fisk / Cecil Cooper 

Posted in Rookie Card Upgrade, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on February 25, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

Since my last post was a Red Sox rookie upgrade, I may was well follow it up with another. 

Carlton Fisk had one of the most memorable home runs in baseball history while with Boston. Here is the raw copy of his 1972 Topps rookie card, which is also the rookie card of another solid player, Cecil Cooper. Like many of the raw vintage rookies in my collection they were a bit soft.
 photo CF85FE2E-D062-4258-A7F4-173412335272_zpsbpfnbgdr.jpg

For the price of two retail blasters I managed to acquire a gorgeous copy of this card, one that I can now proudly display with my other HOF rookie cards.
 photo EDD00E70-D407-4598-838B-A5CAAFAE699D_zpskna8ujsk.jpg

Rookie Card Upgrade: 1960 Topps Carl Yastrzemski

Posted in Rookie Card Upgrade, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on February 23, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

There’s something about Carl Yastrzemski that had always been appealing to me.  Maybe it’s the fact that he’s a legend. Maybe it’s because he played for my favorite team. Maybe it’s because I learned at an early age how to spell his last name and pronounce it. 

Whatever the reason, the 1960 Topps Yastrzemski rookie card has always been high on my want list.  As about a decade ago I acquire a raw copy that I later had slabbed and shown here. 
 photo 16068646-70FE-40D8-BB0F-D3A73C86A5F6_zpsfl6xjizk.jpg

I was happy with what I owned … Until recently when I started doing some upgrading of rookie cards. The Yaz in its 3.5 condition wasn’t bad …it just could be a whole lot better.  The corners were soft, the edges were too.  But this example always had decent centering which made it appealing.

Fast forward to about 10 days ago.  I acquired a 1965 Topps Mickey Mantle card from a seller on eBay who also had a nice BVG 7 Yaz rookie in his inventory.  

So we negotiated a bit and I struck a deal for this gorgeous Yaz. The card an obvious ink defect on the bottom border but centering is nice and the corners are fairly sharp.  And after selling the 3.5 Yaz to one of my Twitter followers, the cost of the upgrade was palatable. 
 photo 3F935229-053E-48E2-9156-DBF927393982_zpsffkb9exv.jpg

One of the aspects of the Yaz rookie that I love is that he is listed as a second baseman. 

Rookie Card Upgrade: 1976 Topps/OPC Dennis Eckersley

Posted in Rookie Card Upgrade with tags , , , , , , , on December 19, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

I’ve owned quite a few Dennis Eckersley rookie cards over the years, all of which are not as good as this raw copy. Kind of sad.

 
Well, thanks to the Internet and a certain card site, I was able to upgrade to a clean PSA 8 O-Pee-Chee rookie. This will also get converted into a BGS/BVG slab at some point.

  

Icon-O-Clasm: Six Swatches of Separation — Rickey Henderson game-used cards

Posted in Icon-O-Clasm with tags , , , , , , , on November 17, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

  

A trip to LCS for supplies leads to purchase of vintage rookies

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, New Addition with tags , , , , , on September 21, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

So earlier today I was taking pictures of some autographs in my collection and noticed that I still needed about 30 single-screw cases for a project I’m working on.  So I headed to the LCS to buy these …

  
Well, I had about 20 minutes to spare and the shop owner tells me he got a bunch of 1940s and older cards in the showcase. 

So I dug through and saw lots of stuff I liked, but really two cards that I absolutely needed for my collection.

  
For less than the price of a hobby box I added two rookie cards of Boston Red Sox legends to my collection, cards that I had only seen online.  Both are considered lower grade, but I love that these were unexpected purchases made in person and from one of the local shops, which I like supporting. 

(Public Service Announcement: If you’ve got a shop near you, buy a single or two every month for your PC and help keep them in business.)

I only had a few minutes at the shop today because I had to get my kids from school, but I had just enough time afterward to take these Instagram pictures on the baseball field at my kids’ school.

1939 Play Ball Bobby Doerr, who at age 97 is presently the oldest living member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

 And 1941 Play Ball Dom DiMaggio, younger brother of The Yankee Clipper Joe DiMaggio, and a star in his own right.