Archive for Clayton Kershaw

MojoMailday: Beating The Odds with Refractors

Posted in Mail Day with tags , , , , , , on September 4, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

Every few weeks I like to participate in a break with MojoBreak and more times than not so look to grab a Dodgers spot because … I collect Clayton Kershaw.

Sometimes the break is priced so fairly that I can’t help but take a shot even if the odds are greatly against me. Such was the case last week when the site broke a mixer of 5 Topps MLB products. The assortment consisted of 2018 Bowman’s Best, and then 2019 editions of Bowman, Stadium Club, Topps Chrome and Five Star.

Well, I definitely beat the odds. First in the single box of Stadium Club there was a Sandy Koufax Chrome Orange Refractor /99. Then in Topps Chrome there was a gold Refractor Clayton Kershaw /50.

It’s true I probably could have gotten both Koufax and Kershaw for about the same price that I paid for the break spot, but then I wouldn’t have this fun story about beating the odds.

The kicker here is I also got a Walker Buehler Bowman’s Best Rookie Refractor, so that’s a trio of shiny Dodgers arms I have added to my collection.

Collecting Kershaw: We have a trade! My nephew and I have struck a deal!

Posted in Collecting Kershaw, Misc. with tags , , , , , , on August 19, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

National Baseball Card Day has come and gone. Both of my kids and my nephew have ripped their packs and between them have amassed some four Clayton Kershaw cards for 2019 NBCD.

Me?

Nope. Not I. None for the guy who actually collects Kershaw. Well, that is until now.

My nephew — a Giants fan — had a pair of them. I asked if he would trade one and he agreed. (Side note, I checked with his parents first and they were OK with it — I already told them I was going to purposely overpay in trade for the Kershaw.)

So I dug through my boxes and grabbed a handful of Giants. And when it came down to it, I offered him 12 cards for his one.

In exchange for his Kershaw Card, I sent him cards of Madison Bumgarner, Buster Posey, Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, Juan Marichal, Evan Longoria, Brandon Crawford, Brandon Belt, Hunter Pence, Bruce Bochy, and Will Clark, whose shirt my nephew wore to school today.

If you’re counting,that’s just 11 names. Who was the 12Th? I actually offered him a Clayton Kershaw Card in the trade — so he could have another one. And in true Giants fashion, he handed it back and said he didn’t need another one.

Absolute comedy.

I sent a message to his parents letting them know a deal had been consummated. His mom (my sister) replied: “All of that for ONE? … You really wanted it.”

I told her that I could buy these Kershaws all day for like a quarter each, but I wanted to see his smile. Also, trading cards with my nephew is absolutely priceless.

Kershaw’s zipper gets “fixed” for Topps Chrome

Posted in Collecting Kershaw, Misc. with tags , , , , on August 14, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

I was tooling around COMC late lastnight looking for new cards to add to my collection when a 2019 Topps Chrome Clayton Kershaw base card popped up.

I knew I needed one for my collection so I clicked on the card. And immediately I could see something looked off.

It’s the zipper!

I have like 12 versions of the base Topps card and upon release I pointed out that Kershaw’s fly was down in the card image, just as it was on the original photo taken on Opening Dy 2018. It looks like Topps fixed the whole crotch region on Kershaw for the Chrome release.

“I put them in my pocket …” (National Baseball Card Day 2019)

Posted in Commentary with tags , , , , , , , on August 10, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

National Baseball Card Day is One of the best days of year when it comes to our beloved hobby.

This year I gathered up my two kids and headed to the card shop. And moments later my sister showed up with her kids, including her son who has gotten into baseball cards thanks in part to my son and I.

We went to South Bay Sports Cards in Sunnyvale, Calif. and while there I ran into one of my Twitter followers who recognized me from pictures I had posted of my kids. (Nick, we should have taken a group photo.)

We made a few small purchases and the kids got a few free packs and the Special Bryce Harper Card.

The purchased packs yielded nothing of real interest. Chrome had a “short” printed Eloy Jimenez.

And so had hoped to personally pull my first Mike Oz Card from a Ginter pack, both of my packs turned out to be less than spectacular.

But, that’s not really what the day was about. It was about the cards that Topps and South Bay Sports Cards put into the hands of the kids

The highlights of my son’s packs included Ronald Acuna, Javier Baez and Justin Verlander.

And my daughter’s packs yielded two of MY PC guys in a single pack and Pete Alonso.

My packs were highlighted by Mike Trout and Matt Chapman, also guys whom I have put aside for my son.

The family posed for a photo in front of the store before we set off on our separate ways.

Then after the photo I asked my daughter where she put her cards since I did not see them in her hand.

Her answer: “I put them in my pocket…”

I shook my head, told her to show me and then took a photo before telling her to take them out. The cards are hers, and I LOVED that she put them in her pocket since most of us have done the same at some point during our collecting careers. But I advised her to take them out and put them in her binder later, which she agreed was a better course of action.

I may not be able to take the kids back next week for the Vlad Guerrero Jr special card, but I’ll find someone to take the kids for me. I love these promotions, it’s especially fun for the kids now that they also collect.

Collecting Kershaw: The Ginter Stained Glass Mini is lost in the mail …

Posted in Collecting Kershaw with tags , , , , on July 28, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

Last weekend while traveling to my grandmother’s 80th birthday I was checking eBay looking at the newly released Allen & Ginter cards of my favorite players. During one search I located one of the Stained Glass Clayton Kershaw minis.

The card was gorgeous. It was listed as a Buy In Now and at the time was one of only three copies for sale. One was at auction, one was listed at $129.99, and this was posted for $89.99. I waited an hour or so, then checked again and the seller had dropped it to $79.99.

It was at moment I decided to pull the trigger.

I purchase was made, the card was mailed and … five days later, the packaged was supposedly delivered. At least that is what the United States Postal Service Tracking Number suggests.

The packaged was reportedly delivered at 5:07 p.m., which is an odd time for the mail to arrive in my area. Nonetheless, the card was not at my door. I figured this was the latest in the unresolved scam of scanning cards a day before their true deliver — something I’d written about in the past — so I didn’t freak out too much. Perhaps it would be delivered a day later.

The next day there was no Kershaw.

And the day after that? There was still no Kershaw.

And the day after the day after the day? Yep, no damn Kershaw.

As a buyer I’m sort of screwed, because it’s assumed that the seller did all that he was supposed to do. He added tracking information and for his part it does show Delivered in the appropriate city. Yet here I am with another crappy story of failed delivery.

I’m still holding out hope that the package arrives at some point in the next few days. But I’ll believe it when I see it. Until then, I’m sort of SOL.

2019 Topps Series 2 Blaster Break #1 (results)

Posted in Box / Pack Break with tags , , , , , , , , on June 15, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

When it comes to Topps Series Two, I am usually not one to overly indulge. By the time this set comes out every year, the luster on the Topps base set has worn off and there are lots of products available from which we can choose, so it’s somewhat of a secondary option.

This year, the feeling is a bit different since there are key rookies in Series Two including rookie cards of Pete Alonso, Eloy Jimenez and Fernando Tatis Jr.; a short-printed Vladimir Guerrero Jr. release (technically not an official rookie card). Also, the set features new cards of two of my favorite players, Clayton Kershaw and Roger Clemens. So it seems natural for me to open at least one blaster to chase the aforementioned, as well as to casually complete the Series Two set to go along with the first series my son and I have nearly completed.

I checked a few Targets this week and managed to find blasters of Series Two at only one store, so I grabbed the first one I saw and headed to the register. Each box contained seven packs of 14 cards, and one manufactured relic card for a total of 99 cards. Here are the overall results.

The manupatch for this blaster bore one of the hottest names in the hobby, Vladimir Guerrero. However, it is of the Hall of Famer Vlad Sr., not the son, Vlad. Jr., whom hobbyists are currently swooning over.

The seven packs contained the following:

Key rookies: Pete Alonso, Eloy Jimenez and Yusei Kikuchi — which really could have been much better if Topps could have used an image from his debut during the Opening Series in Japan, but I’m sure they’re saving that for the Update Series. This photo on the Kikuchi is the same that was used on the Opening Day rookie card.

Short Print: Veteran, Dale Murphy — I dig these horizontal short prints.

Parallels: Rainbow Foil Raisel Iglesias, Gold Carlos Carrasco

Inserts: Aaron Judge Exclusive (#23); 84 All-Stars Alex Bregman and Rickey Henderson; 84 All-Stars Blue Roger Clemens; Franchise Favorites Tony Gwynn and Jose Altuve; Iconic Card Reprints: 73 Topps Carlton Fisk; 150 Great Moments Bartolo Colon.

Comments: This blaster was better than I expected as it held two of the key rookie cards in the set, a short print and a insert parallel of one of the guys I collect.

As for the base cards, I’ll be building a list of needs in the near future. I’ll be more than happy to trade most of the inserts here within for base cards that my son and I need to complete this set, or cards of Kershaw and Clemens.

The kids will get to see Kershaw pitch

Posted in Collecting Kershaw, Misc. with tags , , , , , , on June 7, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

Today is a special day. Los Angeles Dodgers star pitcher Clayton Kershaw is set to take the mound tonight at Oracle Park, home of the rival San Francisco Giants, and not only will I be there to see the future Hall of Famer take the mound, but so will my kids and my nephew.

The Points are Poop gang will finally get to watch the player whose cards they see all over my home, the player whose game-used items and cards are frequently arriving by mail, and the guy whose picture I took in 2015 and had the image printed on canvas and eventually hung in my hallway.

This will be my fourth time seeing my favorite player pitch. My sister and I saw him in 2015 as he locked down the NL West title in San Francisco in what was scheduled to be a pitchers duel against Madison Bumgarner. Kershaw was masterful that night, allowing just one hit and striking out 13 batters. It was at that game I took the aforementioned photo I had printed on canvas, and it is also the game at which the image used on this 2016 Stadium Club Gold Autograph card was snapped.

I saw Kershaw again last season when the Dodgers came through Oakland; and of course My sister and I saw him at Game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium when my favorite team knocked around my favorite player in order to clinch the World Series Championship.

If this was just me going, I would have ponied up for seats along the first base line, but with three kids going with me, the budget just doesn’t allow for such premium seats. Instead we’ll be taking the game in from the bleachers.

Kershaw may not be the dominant pitcher he was five years ago, and I won’t pretend that he is the best in the game — pretty sure Max Scherzer has that title at the moment — but it’s pretty special for me to bring my kids and my sister’s son to a game that features my favorite active player.

By comparison, I only saw Roger Clemens — my childhood favorite — pitch twice, once on Opening Day 1999, which his first start with New York, and again in 2007 as a member of the Houston Astros. My ex wife was with me on both occasions.

I did have loose plans to see him in 1997 when the Blue Jays came through Oakland in May of that year, but I had a medical emergency right around my birthday that prevented that from happening — I wound up watching that game from a hospital bed. And in the early to mid 1990s I really didn’t have the means to see him as the Red Sox ace, which is unfortunate.