Archive for Donruss

Another iconic card added to the Icons collection

Posted in New Addition with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 10, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

Additions to my personal collection have slowed down in recent months, so when I make an acquisition that fits into that “PC” category, I shall share it.

Like many of you I have an addiction, a true sickness for cardboard. I say this somewhat in jest, but there is some truth to it. I spend more money on cards than I should; I even find myself buying stuff just for the sake of buying. Don’t laugh, you might be in the same boat but just not willing to admit it.

But rather than walk away from the hobby that has been a part of my life since I was 7 years old, the way I “right the ship” so to say is to find one card to add to my collection; one that i can point to and say, “THAT is why I collect.”

img_0879And today that card is the 2001 SP Legendary Cuts Game-Used bat card of the one and only “Shoeless” Joe Jackson.

When it comes to memorabilia cards I have many of the greats.

I have Mantle. I have Mays. I have Aaron.

I have Ruth. I have Gehrig. I have DiMaggio.

I have Mathewson. I have Cobb. I have Wagner.

And the list goes on …

But there has always been one player whose memorabilia card that has taunted me from a  distance. And now I can look at Joe Jackson eye to eye and clutch his card between my thumb and index finger like it were a big ol’ bass and say, “Gotcha!”

For a long time Jackson, the controversial baseball player whose legendary playing career is forever tied to the gambling scandal of the “Black Sox,” really only had one licensed memorabilia card, this 2001 Upper Deck release. More than a half-decade after the card’s release, Donruss (then owned by the company known as Donruss Playoff) lost its MLB license and with that came the release of various logo-less products. This “free reign” seemingly allowed them to produce cards of Jackson, base and insert cards, as well as memorabilia cards. Panini America, who now owns the Donruss name, continues to produce Jackson cards in all forms under various brand names.There now are several options for collectors when it comes to Jackson memorabilia cards.

Meanwhile, Topps, the only company with the MLB license, has not produced any cards, likely because Jackson has been blackballed — not unlike Pete Rose — from licensed products. His name is often met with a head tilt and a grimace as Jackson’s actions in the gambling scandal are still somewhat debatable, although time has shown that he may have been the good guy in all of it.

Nonetheless, Jackson is still a baseball icon. Over his 13-year career he notched a .356 batting average and tallied 1,772 hits. And while I don’t own any of his older cards, at least I can say that I now own a piece of Jackson’s bat and it’s not just on any card. It’s THE Jackson memorabilia card, which is one of the most recognizable in our hobby.

Thrift Treasures 89: What’s In The Box?!

Posted in Thrift Treasures with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 23, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

When I hit thrift stores and find sports cards, they are usually stored in two ways: stuffed into small bags and priced per bundle or just left in a box and marked with a price. On a recent trip, the latter was the form in which the cards were found.    Behind the counter where they keep the ‘good” stuff was a box marked “Baseball Cards” The Box was one of the eight-section sorter boxes, which by themselves usually cost $3-$4 each. The $7.99 price tag on the box intrigued me as I felt this was worth the purchase if there was anything remotely of interest inside. So I waved down the clerk and said, “What’s in the box? Here is essentially what I saw.    It was a hoard of Donruss cards, lots of 1988, a good number of 1987, but also some 1981 through 1983.  I also took a quick peek and saw a stack of 1980s Minor League cards. I closed the box and bought it. As one could imagine, the stacks contained just what you would expect, lots of Hall of Famers mixed in with a bunch of 1980s common guys. In all there were more than 65 Hall of Famers — the typical 1980s mix of Rickey Henderson, Dave Winfield, Tony Gwynn, George Brett, Mike Schmidt, Andre Dawson, and of course Rollie Fingers and his mustache.    There were two 1977 All-Time All-Stars cards, ones of Rogers Hornsby (trimmed) and Lefty Grove.    The Minor League cards were fun as usual. A bunch of guys whom I had never heard of, and a few who actually made it to The Show, headlined by Devon White and Randy Myers.     One interesting card is this one of then Mets farmhand Randy Milligan, who would eventually become a member of the Baltimore Orioles.      What makes it interesting? Look at those stats and all that biographical information! Even the card of El Paso trainer Pete Kold has more words. Oops.    If you have been following my collecting journey you know that rookie cards of everyone — EVERYONE — are what I like to collect.  What better way to fill a few dozen holes that to find loads of stuff from the 1980s.    There were guys whom I hadn’t heard of, such as Marvis Foley and of the White Sox and Ricky Peters of the Tigers. There were lots of solid Major Leaguers like Curt Schilling, Ken Caminiti, Jack McDowell, Mike Greenwell, Mark Gubicza, and John Kruk. And ot course there were rookie cards of Hall of Famers — remember recent HOF classes have rookie cards from the “Junk Wax” era — Roberto Alomar, Tom Glavine and John Smoltz. Surprisingly the cards are NOT thrashed.    There are probably more than a million of each 1988 Donruss card, making them relatively worthless. But these miscut ones are of some — minimal — interest.    And we’ll finish with a few current Major League coaches shown during their playing days.    Total cost of these treasures: $7.99 You can see more Thrift Treasures posts Here

Icon-O-Clasm: 1989 Donruss Pop-Up Will Clark “Casting Shadows”

Posted in Icon-O-Clasm with tags , , , , on January 30, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

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An Auto A Day … #6

Posted in An Auto A Day with tags , , , , , , , on August 24, 2014 by Cardboard Icons

I’ve got a thing for former players who turn manager/coach. This is not a new trend, but it’s interesting for me to see this these days as I clearly remember some of the players-turned managers/coaches when they first came into Major League Baseball.

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Such is the case with Torey Lovullo. He was somewhat of a prospect with the Tigers. The thing I remember most about him was having rookie cards in 1989 products … I pulled a ton of them while hunting for Griffey rookies of course. He spent part of eight seasons in the Majors with seven different teams before ending his MLB career in 1999.

Lovullo’s baseball career, however, didn’t stop as a player. Two years after retirement he got into managing and coaching and worked his way through the Cleveland Indians minor league system. He then followed current Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell to the Toronto Blue Jays and then from Toronto to Boston, where he is a bench coach. Lovullo was a top candidate for the Chicago Cubs managerial gig in 2010 and it’s probably only a matter of time before he gets a manager gig in the majors.

As noted, Lovullo has rookies in 1989, including in the high series of Upper Deck. He has a single certified autograph: 1996 Leaf Signature Extended.

An Auto A Day … #5

Posted in An Auto A Day with tags , , , , , on August 23, 2014 by Cardboard Icons

Here’s another solid Major Leaguer who used his skill set on the field to help him get a job in the dugout.

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Brad Ausmus, a three-time Gold Glove winner and an all-star, spent 18 seasons as a Big League catcher. His career started in 1993 with the San Diego Padres and ran through 2010 with the Los Angeles Dodgers. And just three years after retirement, he found himself as the skipper of one of the best teams in Major League Baseball, the Detroit Tigers.

Often regarded as one of the game’s nicest guys, Ausmus proved to be the same to fans as he frequently signed Through The Mail (TTM). That said, how does a guy spent nearly two decades in the majors — a time frame that coincides with a book in certified autographed in the hobby — yet he only has one signed card (1996 Leaf Signature Autographs), with two parallels of the same. Ausmus only has one true rookie card as well, a 1992 Topps card that he shares with three other guys.

An Auto A Day … #4

Posted in An Auto A Day with tags , , , , , on August 22, 2014 by Cardboard Icons

If you were a baseball fan after the strike of 1994, you surely remember that the Montreal Expos (which later became the Washington Nationals) were one of the better teams in baseball at the time, and in 1995 they had a hell of a left handed phenom on their hands by the name of Carlos Perez.

IMG_2984The brother of two Major Leaguers — both of whom were right handed — Carlos Perez was a flamboyant pitcher during his rookie season in 1995 — he made the all-star team that season –and after each strikeout, he’d do this funky twitch movement on the mound to celebrate his punch outs. Some people liked it; others hated it. Go figure.  At the time SportsCenter was really the only sports cable show available nationwide, so he was a constant on. He wasn’t really a strikeout machine but seemed that way given the rate at which is highlights were shown.

But due to injuries and off-the-field nonsense, Perez’s career never blossomed to the levels that many figured he could reach. He would miss all of 1996 due to injury and played parts of two more seasons with Les Expos before being traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers, where his MLB career ended in 2000.

Perez made it into nearly all of the 1995 products and has an astounding 15 rookie cards — his Bowman’s Best or Topps Finest are best in my opinion — but only really has one certified autograph. If you guessed 1996 Leaf Signature Series, you’re right. The base autograph is shown here and then there are two parallels of the same card.

Thrift Treasures 71: “They have a bunch of cards in boxes … and they are cheap.”

Posted in Thrift Treasures with tags , , , , , , , , on August 7, 2014 by Cardboard Icons

So, my intention was to hit you guys next with another short post about items that I found at The National.  But on this day, I actually have a fresh Thrift Treasures post based on items that I found just a few hours ago.

I made the rounds to one of the local thrift stores this morning and while looking at about a dozen baggies or so, some random guy walks up to me and asks if I’ve ever been to a nearby town, which is one of the rich cities in the neighborhood.  I give him a stare as if my eyes were saying “why the hell are you asking me this?’

A few seconds of silence pass and he says, ” well, they have this thrift store there. They have a bunch of cards in boxes … and they are cheap.” The man tells me baseball cards are not his thing, so he figured he’d let me know.

Five minutes later I’m on the freeway headed to said thrift store, which i did not know even existed.

Located in an old house turned into a store front, I located the cards he spoke of.

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My jaw dropped and my heart skipped a beat because as you can see from the picture, they had multiple boxes marked as 1989 Upper Deck baseball sets.  I opened them and determined that all cards were in there … except for THE card, the Ken Griffey Jr.  Each box was priced at $4. Even at $4 those sets are decent.  There are some iconic cards and some good rookies.  The issue I had was that I already had three 1989 UD Sets.  I decided to pass.

What I did walk away with though was a complete 1987 Fleer baseball set, which had a Will Clark and Bo Jackson rookie card sitting in Top Loaders on top of the set inside the box.  I then checked to see if card 604 was there.  Barry Lamar Bonds was indeed there.  The Bonds single can be had for about $4, but I’ll take the whole set for this price.  I always liked this set anyway.

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And secondly there was a box of 1989 Donruss baseball sitting there.  Wax packs completely and the box looking just as it did some 25 years ago when it came out of the case.

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Well, I ripped the packs.  No Griffey. Insert fail horn here.

But I did get a Randy Johnson, two Curt Schillings and a Craig Biggio.  I also found a pack with a Don Mattingly Diamond King on the back,m so I kept that sealed. And I got to create these colorful pictures. Wee!

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Total cost of these treasures: $8

To see more Thrift Treasures posts, click HERE