Archive for Fleer

Mailday! But what’s wrong with this picture?

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , on November 22, 2013 by Cardboard Icons

Just picked up my mail, and it was an awesome card day. But take a look at this picture and tell me what is wrong.

Hint, I’m NOT speaking of the scotch tape that was used.

See it yet?

If you answered yes. Good job. If you answered no, you’re technically right too. Where’s the penny sleeves, bro?!

This ain’t rocket science. It’s not hard to protect good cards. It’s as simple as making a hamburger — bun-meat-bun. Or in this case, card, penny sleeve Top loader.

Thrilled to have the cards, believe me. But as much as I paid for these — especially the short printed 2000 Greats of the Game Duke Snider auto — you’d think the seller could toss a few penny sleeves in here.

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Latest COMC mailday … sigs, sigs and more sigs

Posted in New Addition with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 12, 2013 by Cardboard Icons

IMG_3123Over the last four months I’ve made about 40 purchases on the consignment site COMC.com.  I’ve said it before — and I will continue to say it going forward — if you haven’t at lease checked out the site, you’re missing out.

Anyhow, the batch of cards arrived over the weekend and as the title of this post suggests … it’s full of ink.

TEN Hall of Fame signatures, an iconic one and a slew of prospect (and failed prospect) autographs filled this batch.

OK, enough of the shenanigans, let’s get to it.

We’ll start with a solid rookie card I’ve needed for quite some time — a 1955 Bowman Elston Howard.  Howard isn’t a hall of famer, but his career was significant.  Howard was the first black player to ever don a Yankees uniform, he was a 12-time all star, an MVP in 1960 and a six-time World Series Champion.  SOLID.

IMG_3110Speaking of MVP’s here’s a 2009 SP Legendary Cuts cut signature of the 1926 National League MVP Bob O’Farrell, who played for four teams during his 21-year career, including two stints with the Cubs and three stops with the Cardinals.

IMG_3115Here’s a 2010 Bowman Chrome autograph prospect card of a contender for the American League 2013 MVP award, Josh Donaldson.  He won;t win it — because it’s hard to pick him over Miguel Cabrera, who made another run at the Triple Crown this year — but he had a legit season.  At one point these Donaldson chrome signatures were over $20 each.  Just after the World Series I managed to grab this one for less than $8.  His signature isn’t hard to find, but this release is THE card to own — well of the non-parallel versions anyway.

IMG_3109Here’s a few prospect/failed prospect autos:

IMG_3107IMG_3126A few vintage rookies:

1933 Goudey Joe Sewell.  Did you know that Sewell, a Hall of Famer, struck out a total of 114 times during his career?  American League Home Run Champion Chris Davis struck out 199 times in just 2013.

IMG_30651933 Goudey Bernie Friberg.

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1934 Goudey Dolph Camilli.  Camilli took home the American League Most Valuable Player award in 1941, slugging a league-best 34 homers and driving in 120 RBI’s.

IMG_3112Here’s a card that always intrigued me: 1994 SP Holoview Michael Jordan.  Jordan didn;thave a basic SP rookie from this set; if he had one, it would be an epic card.  Instead we are left with this holoview caard, which is cool, but not nearly as cool as a foil, condition-sensitive rookie card would’ve been.  An if for some reason you’ve never handled one of thee Holoview cards, try to check one out … UD’s technology in the early 1990s was second to none.  The hologram of Jordan incorporates several images of Jordan’s face, so when you turn the card, he’s always looking at you.

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Here’s a pair of 2004 Bowman Heritage Signs of Authority autographs … I’m sort of working on this set.  Who collects umpire signatures?  This guy.

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How about a pair of 2012 Panini Cooperstown Signatures of journalist Murray Chass and Marty Brennaman.  I love these non-player signatures.

IMG_3120So yeah, Hall of Famer autographs … Here’s five.

1993 Nabisco Jim “Catfish” Hunter w/ COA.

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1998 Donruss Signature Series Ozzie Smith /2000

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2001 Fleer Greats of the Game Rollie Fingers.

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2001 Fleer Greats of the Game Tom Seaver

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2001 Topps Team Legends Mike Schmidt rookie reprint autograph

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Last week I declared war on the 2000 Fleer Greats of the Game autograph set.  Here’s a few of the ones I purchased over the last few months on the site.  The highlight is the shortprinted Willie McCovey.

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And perhaps the prize of the whole package … a 2013 Panini Golden Age Historic Signatures Jackie Earle Haley, who played “Kelly Leak” on the Bad News Bears.

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Chasing dreams: the 2000 Greats of the Game autograph set

Posted in Hall of Famers with tags , , , , , , , on November 2, 2013 by Cardboard Icons

For more than a decade, I’ve been drawn to the greatness of the 2000 Greats of the Game autograph set.  I think I’ve shared the story before, but the very first pack of this product that I opened in 2000 contained the ONE card I really wanted from the set:  Nolan Ryan.  Yeah, I called my shot.  And yes, you’ve heard this before because I know for a fact that I’ve written about it before.

YazI toyed with the idea over the years of collecting the set.  It’s a gorgeous set, I know it’s highly collectible, and in my opinion, the checklist is absolutely stellar.  There are a few “duds” but that’s beside the point.  Most of the least-desirable cards can be had relatively cheap.

Well, it’s official, I’m declaring my war on the 2000 Greats of the Game gold-border auto set … with one exception, that Derek Jeter autograph that is limited to 150 copies.

Here’s my issue with the card:  It was a redemption only and was not released until 2001.  And not only is it a year older, it appears to have been made with a glossy card stock.  Eff that!  Part of the charm of the 2000 set is the smooth non-glossy texture.  It’s hard to describe, but it kind of feels like vellum paper.

Anyhow, I’ve added an updated list and made it public so that you can see what exactly I am missing.  Surprisingly, I am already more than half way to the set … although once I get to the short prints, I’ll be looking at some pretty pricey cards.  Lucky me.

 

Icon-O-Clasm: 1998 Ultra Gold Medallion Ken Caminiti

Posted in Icon-O-Clasm, Instagram Portraits with tags , , , , , , , on March 24, 2013 by Cardboard Icons

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Icon-O-Clasm: 2000 Greats of the Game Autographs Hoyt Wilhelm

Posted in Icon-O-Clasm, Instagram Portraits with tags , , , , on February 12, 2013 by Cardboard Icons

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Reliving childhood memories at Dollar Tree

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , on February 18, 2011 by Cardboard Icons

By now, most of you know that Dollar Tree carries sports cards. Most of the stuff they sell isn’t highly sought after.  In fact, it’s downright junk.  I mean why would someone pay $1 for 2010 Topps Update pack containing 5 cards and no shot at any hits or parallels when you can spend $2 at Target or Walmart and get twice as many cards and have a shot at inserts?

But on occasion I find something worth while.  In this case, I found a little piece of my childhood.

The year 1988 was a special year for me as a collector.  It was my first true year of collecting.  Sure, I bought some packs in 1987, but it was in 1988 that I really got hooked on cardboard.  I loved Donruss for the Rated Rookies, and had fun finding odd-ball packs at random convenience and grocery stores throughout the area

At Dollar Tree last week, I found a sealed Cello Pack of 1988 Donruss … one featuring new HOF Roberto Alomar on the top.  Under normal circumstances I would have just chucked the pack to the side as this product is the epitome of junk.  But there was no way I could pass up on this pack given the card showing on top.

Truth be told though, that find was not as exciting as unearthing these two packs: 1988 Fleer Star Stickers and 1988 Sportflics.

The Star Stickers set is one that always intrigued me because in 1988 I could only find these packs at one store — a 7-Eleven near my grandfather’s house, which seemed worlds away at the time. I bought a handful of packs back in the day, hoping to pull any player from the Oakland A’s, probably the hottest team in the sport at the time. I didn’t have very good luck.

But on this day, I struck gold in the form of a Carney Lansford card — who ironically is from the area where I live.

Like the Fleer Stickers, packs of Sportlics were only available at one store in my area — a grocery store across the street from my house.   If memory serves me right, these packs were about 50 cents for a pack of three cards.  In 1988, this was pricey. Needless to say, I only bought a few of them when I was a kid.  So I was excited to unwrap one the other day.  Unfortunately the results were typical for what I would have pulled 23  years ago.

Doin’ Two Babes at the Same Time

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 12, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

Made you look, didn’t I?

So here’s a hypothetical question I’ve been pondering as it pertains to my two Babe Ruth vintage cards: You’ve only got room for one of the pictured cards in your collection in the depicted condition. Which do you choose?

Your choices include a 1960 Fleer Babe Ruth in decent condition, off-center top to bottom and right to left, rounded corners and some surface wear; and a 1967 Topps Venezuelan Babe Ruth in horrible shape, akin to the remains of a bar of soap found in a single man’s shower.

Now before you answer, I want you to consider all the factors.

The ’60 Babe Ruth is older, in nicer condition and features him in action, sorta. The back also has his career statistics (pitching and hitting), which is a big plus. It is a vintage Ruth, a card of which you can be proud to own. It’s decently valued at $100 in Beckett Baseball, but copies can be attained on eBay for about $20 in similar shape. For any collector, such a card would be a nice addition.

The ’67 Ruth is newer and just beat to a pulp. It’s rough around the edges, the card contains FIVE corners because part of the card has fallen off, it’s got evidence of having been stapled to something, and the back is written in Spanish — no statistics. Beckett Baseball has it valued at $700. But here’s where things get tricky. You’re going to have a hard time finding this card on eBay. It was produced for the people in Venezuelan four decades ago. There has not been a copy of this card on eBay in forever.

Both cards are encapsulated and deemed authentic by Beckett Grading.

Knowing these factors, which do you decide is right for your collection: The more plentiful, better condition 1960 Fleer card, or the much rarer, yet worse condition, 1967 Topps Venezuelan?

Remember, we are only talking about the pictured cards in this condition. You MUST choose only one. The card you choose can and will be the only Babe Ruth vintage card you ever own.