Archive for Jersey Numbers

Rookie Card parallel featuring rookie jersey serial number … sorta

Posted in Collecting Kershaw with tags , , , , , , on March 1, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

When it comes to Clayton Kershaw, there is one jersey number he will forever be remembered for wearing … and it’s 22.

But truth be told, he not only has worn 22. He has worn 54 for the Dodgers during his rookie season, and he has worn 46 and 75 as documented on various 2006-2008 Topps products.

The other day while checking for newly listed Kershaw cards on eBay I came across a tough rookie-year parallel, a 2008 Stadium Club Blue Photographer’s Proof parallel of Kershaw’s TSC rookie card. The card is serial numbered 75/99 … the 75 is significant because that is the jersey number Kershaw is wearing on his 2008 Topps Allen & Ginter and Topps Update rookie cards, among others.

For what it’s worth, I had only seen one other of this parallel card on eBay in recent history and it is still priced way more than I wanted to pay. But when this one popped up at a lower Buy It Now price and with a Best Offer option, I shot over an offer and within 20 minutes had negotiated a purchase price for about half of what the original BIN was. The card arrived earlier this week.

Regardless of the serial number, I decided the card was going to me mine. But the fact that this card had a serial number with some “importance” makes it a bit sweeter.

Player collectors have different methods for their madness. They sometimes only collect base cards, or chase the hits. And when it comes to serial numbered cards they sometimes can be very specific about THE one they need to own. I’m not entirely biased in that way, but I will often shop for a serial number that is appealing, and will pay a slight premium for cards featuring the serial number matching the player’s jersey number. In the case of this Stadium Club rookie parallel, I admit it’s a bit of a stretch, but it is a nice bonus to own this tougher find with a serial number matching the jersey number Kershaw is wearing on one of his significant rookie cards — it’s just too bad he’s not shown on this specific card wearing that number. Then again, if that were the case, I might have been able to get this card at the price I was able to negotiate.

Serial numbers matter … sometimes.

Posted in Misc. with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 5, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

As a player collector there comes a time when you ask yourself: How much is that serial number on that insert or parallel worth? More specifically, how much of a premium do you place on a serial number that matches the player’s jersey number.

Personally, it matters to me … but only to a point. I won’t pay a significant premium for such things, but I will pay more than ai would for every other serial number.

And it’s really an inconsistent thing, truthfully. Like for inserts or parallels that I really enjoy, I’ll definitely pay a bigger premium. But for sets like Topps Moments and Milestones, I may not even care.

The topic came to kind again today as I received my latest Roger Clemens serial numbered parallel : a 2007 Bowman Heritage Black Border serial numbered 22/52.

Clemens is a tricky one, he wore three jersey numbers over the course of his career. He wore 21 with the Red Sox and Blue Jays, and then initially 12 with the Yankees, before moving to 22, which he wore in For the remainder of his New York career and his time in Houston.

Card of the Day: 1953 Bowman Color Mickey Mantle

Posted in Card of the Day with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 16, 2008 by Cardboard Icons

**Note: With the All-Star game taking place this week at Yankee Stadium, I will spend the next several days showcasing cards from my Yankee collection.

The Mick. For about as long as I have followed baseball, Mickey Mantle has been a mythical figure to which I could not relate. I never got to see him play, and by the time I truly got a chance to understand his greatness, he near the end of his life. He died in 1995. I still have the Beckett Baseball Monthly issue dedicated to his death. That issue, which I took to school for a week, brought about lots of memories from other high schoolers who spoke of their father’s card collections. And it also caught then attention of one teacher who spoke of Mantle … and then about a newly emerging technology called deoxyribonucleic acid, better known as DNA. Continue reading