Archive for Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Rookie Card Showcase: 1994 Bowman Darren Oliver

Posted in Rookie Card Showcase with tags , , , , , , , on October 12, 2009 by Cardboard Icons
Sixteen Big League seasons means I am NOT a scrub.

Sixteen Big League seasons means I am NOT a scrub.

You’re probably asking yourself why I am showing the rookie card of this scrub. Well, truth be told, he’s not who you think he is.

Sure, he’s no Johan Santana, but Oliver (or in some people’s vocabulary, “scrub”) is an established Major Leaguer who is a vital cog in the bullpen of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim of Southern California of the United States of the Planet Earth.

Just because a guy does not light the world of cardboard icons on fire doesn’t mean he isn’t worthy of recognition. Oliver, shown here on a 1994 Bowman card, has spent 16 seasons in the Major Leagues in different roles with eight teams. It takes a certain amount of talent to stay in this game at the highest level for more than a decade and a half.

Fact: Not all commons in the hobby are real life baseball scrubs.

Fiction: Career longevity leads to hobby love.

This is the part six of an ongoing series. To see other parts in this series, click here.

Rookie Card Showcase: 1964 Topps Tony Conigliaro

Posted in Rookie Card Showcase with tags , , , , , , on October 8, 2009 by Cardboard Icons
1964ToppsTonyConigliaro

What could have been?

Got another series of posts I’ve decided to start this week. I’m going to call it the Rookie Card Showcase. This series of posts will highlight rookie cards in my collection — sometimes with a little explanation, other times just an image.

The first card in the series is this 1964 Topps Tony Conigliaro rookie. Why? I’m hoping it will bring good karma to my Red Sox as they take on the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim of Southern California of the Southern Hemisphere of the United States of America of the planet Earth in the American League Division Series.

Conigliaro was a promising Red Sox hitter who was one of the youngest players in baseball history to collect 100 home runs.  Of course no one remembers that. They all remember the dreaded incident that happened in 1967 against the Angels when Tony C. was hit in the face with a fastball, basically ruining his career. In case you forgot, it left him looking like this.

This is the part one of an ongoing series. To see other parts in this series, click here.