Archive for Michael Jordan

That one time we all bought shirts, underwear with our card money

Posted in Box / Pack Break with tags , , , , , , , on March 12, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

One day we’re all going to laugh at what has transpired over the last week — Us card collectors venturing past checkout lanes, where the cards are usually sold, and speed walking to the clothing department to hunt our wears.

I laughed last week when I saw people on Twitter filling shopping cards with new packages of Hanes underwear and shirts, most of which were solely purchased for the bonus item — a pack of five Fleer Michael Jordan cards with a 1 in a 100,000 chance at obtaining his autograph.

When I saw the cards were live and there was a frenzy, I immediately figured people would go into stores and find a way to rip the card packs off the packages or buy the item and then return the clothing without the cards. Sadly, I did not buy the notion that so many folks were actually going to donate any of the clothing to persons in need.

I digress, I managed to stay away from the stores this weekend, so I didn’t partake in the first rush that seemed to be taking place at the end of last week. But then Monday rolled around and there I was doing groceries at Target … and I decided “just to see” if any of the Jordan cards had made it to the store.

Sure enough there were a few mixed in among the standard Hanes merchandise. While I didn’t need any of the wears for myself — I did just buy new undergarments about a month ago — I was faced with a decision: Does my SON need any new underwear or shirts?

The answer, of course, was yes. On both. And truthfully, I would have just bought one package, but the wrapper said to buy a red pack and a blue pack to complete the set.

And the smirk on Mike’s face here says it all. Because little did I know that we’d need much more than just a red and a blue pack to complete this set …

I bought a pack of underwear and shirts for my son and then ripped the card packs open in the car. The very first card front I laid eye upon was this glorious screen grab from a commercial. The picture was apropos as it looks like Mike just got a whiff of some rancid milk — or in my case, a brilliant marketing scheme to sell more undergarments.

Because we all know that we needed cards of Michael Jordan palming a football helmet …

And palming a pumpkin …

And wearing a bright white Hanes t-shirt, probably tagless for comfort, under a black vest — all presented within a holofoil insert to make us feel like we got something special.

This whole Jordan-Hanes-Upper Deck campaign is magnificent. It got us talking about undergarments; it got us collectors who would rather spend money on cards than lunch to go buy clothes. It got us to again talk about a company without a basketball card license. And they seem to have done it without even showing the greatest basketball player in history doing anything basketball related. Hell, the closest I got in my packs was him carrying golf clubs.

Damn, I wanna be like Mike.

What’s in that box? “Basketball Floor Box” edition

Posted in Box / Pack Break, Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , on June 19, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

By now if you’re a frequent visitor of the sports card aisle at Target you’ve seen these not-so-fancy looking repack boxes distributed by Fairfield. The boxes show you a piece of wood and boast that the lumber is a piece of game-used floor from the 2011 NBA All-Star Game.

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For $12.99 you get a piece of floor, three packs, a memorabilia card, a Kevin Durant rookie, and a pack of Teenymates. I’m not a basketball collector really, but I will say that the floor piece intrigued me. The Target I was at had two of these boxes, one of these had a plain piece of wood and the other had a two-tone piece that appeared to have some paint on it. I decided that I was intrigued enough to buy it and bring this post to you to share what was inside.

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We’ll start with the wood.  Funny enough when I opened the box the wood tumbled into my hand and I immediately thought it was a piece of a train track from my son’s toy bin. I wondered if there was any stamp of authenticity, but there was none.  Instead I later found in the box a small folded COA that spells out that the floor is from the Staples Center, home of the Los Angeles Lakers and Los Angeles Clippers.  The COA references “nbalab.com” which is Web site I’d never heard. And even to this day if you type up the address, you get a stale home screen, the words “Coming Soon” in the corner, and some verbiage about what the site hopes to bring to the world. In short, I’m still not sure if there is a direct association with the NBA other than the use of the logo and the three initials in the name. What does this mean about the authenticity? Got me. I guess if we have questions we can just e-mail Bill, as it says on the COA. Personally, I’ll take it for what it appears to be: A unique piece of wood purported to be from the NBA all-star game and from the court on which legend Kobe Bryant played. What’s it worth?  Less than $12.99.

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My memorabilia card came in the form of a 2008-09 Upper Deck Ben Gordon white swatch, which feels like some sort of patch and not your basic fabric. That’s a win … I suppose.

The Durant rookie is a 2007-08 Topps Retail factory Set Orange exclusive. They can be had for about $4 on COMC.com … if they were mint, which this one is not due to the fact that it bounced around inside the package.

My three packs actually surprised me as two of them were 2014-15 Prizm retail. I was fully expecting three 1990-91 Hoops packs. Only one of those Hoops packs made it into this box and both Prizm packs had Prizm parallels, which is a win I suppose. The Hoops pack was what you’d expect — a bit of a memory flashback from when I was a kid. And while not much of anything in that set is worth anything, I did get a Michael Jordan base card, which is always fun to see.

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I’ll spare your time with the Teenymates. Move along, nothing to see there.

Would I buy another? Probably not, but that doesn’t mean you should buy one if the piece of purported floor intrigues you.

Cardboard bucket list item acquired; Welcome Michael Jordan auto

Posted in Mail Day with tags , , , , on August 21, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

  
 There are few players who played their respective sport at the level at which Michael Jordan did. And when it comes to the hobby, there is probably no other name who commands the premium that Jordan does.

When it comes to Jordan, I never tried to compete with other collectors to get his cards. Yes, I own his 1986-87 Fleer rookie.   

I own his Nike postcard “rookie”  

I also recently added a Gem Mint 1994 Collector’s Choice baseball rookie to my collection.  

I also own a dual-relic baseball card.  

But the one glaring hole in my collection — not just Jordan collection, but my entire card collection — has been a Jordan autograph.

Well, that problem has been solved.

Let me introduce you to my newest addition. The latest bucket list card marked off the list. Here is the 2013-14 UD Black “Old School” Michael Jordan autograph, limited to just 23 copies.  

Jordan autographs are readily available, but they are pricey.  And they come in so many variations that I wanted to make sure that when I acquired one it was one I actually wanted to hold onto.

The price point for this one was on par with what one would expect to pay for a Jordan auto. And while I would have preferred a Bulls card (always two to three times what I paid for this one) or a White Sox card (doesn’t exist) this on-card example is far superior to the signed floor cards that are all over the market.

And so, my Jordan auto has arrived and taken its place in my collection. It might be times to settle down on the big purchases and start purging again, just as I did in 2010 after I acquired my 1951 Bowman Mickey Mantle rookie card.

Just what I always wanted … A Gem Mint Michael Jordan rookie

Posted in Mail Day with tags , , , , , on July 20, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

I received a package from CheckOutMyCards recently chock full of items I wanted for my PC.  My intention was to write one post showing them all but that’d be quite lengthy. So I’ll go about this in a different manner and show items on an individual or group basis.

 I’ll start with a BGS 9.5 1994 Upper Deck Collector’s Choice rookie card of Michael Jordan. While it is no where near in demand as his 1986-87 Fleer basketball rookie card, this Gem Mint copy of this Jordan rookie will look fantastic in my collection with my BGS 6 Fleer basketball Jordan and 6.5 1986 Nike Postcard.

Jordan had three rookie cards produced in 1994, all by Upper Deck.  He has basic Upper Deck, the Collector’s Choice card shown here, and a Fun Packs card, which is not as easy to find, but hardly rare.

Right after I bought the Gem Mint copy, I picked up a raw “silver signature” parallel for about $1.  Why? Why not!

  
And for good measure I shelled out another $3 for two more Jordan baseball cards.  A 1994 Action Packed Minor Leagues card and a 1995 Upper Deck card featuring Jordan and Harry Carey. 

  
  

Thrift Treasures 87: Starting LineUp cards galore, including Jordan (SLUs!)

Posted in Thrift Treasures with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 9, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

  
When I was a kid, we didn’t have highly detailed McFarlane toys for athletes. Instead, we had Starting LineUps, made by Kenner.
For a while these toys were hot. They were first produced in 1988, and I believe they ran until 2000, at which time the aforementioned McFarlane line had entered the scene.

The Kenner toys weren’t detailed, but the faces sort of looked like the players, and if nothing else the uniforms at least helped us figure out who the figure depicted.

One of the cool things about Starting LineUps, or SLUs, was the fact that they came with at least one card, and sometimes a second card, a coin, or a poster. I liked the figures but I always wanted the cards, because when it gets down to it, I’m a card guy. 

While I never personally opened my SLUs when they were sealed — I hung them on the wall — I always traded for the cards when people made them available.

So, imagine the giddiness that came over me this week when I hit a thrift store and saw this.

  
I asked to see the box up close and could see that it was full of SLU cards.

I then peaked at another box and saw that it, too, had more SLU cards.

  
I busted into the boxes and stopped immediately when I saw the 1988 Statting LineUp card shown above.  It was in the first stack I grabbed.  The Jordan hails from the very first basketball release for this set.  Crazy to think that this card would be found in the wild like this.  Sure, it’s not mint. And true, it’s not worth big money, but this is not a card you should find in a thrift store.

While there was not another Jordan SLU card in the box, I did find many stars and in all nearly 250 SLU cards, most of which are basketball.

  
It’s worth noting that the Tim Duncan shown here is a rookie-year card release. 

I can’t possibly show all of the cards, but here are a few more

  
  
  
  
Additionally, there were 17 posters.

  
 

Total cost of these treasures: $17.98

You can see more Thrift Treasures posts Here.

Michael Jordan wishes you a Happy Valentines Day

Posted in Misc. with tags , , , on February 13, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

Raise your hand of you have these bad boys out during Valentines Day during the early 1990s!

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I sure as hell did. And honestly, I wish a kept a box of them for myself.

I have memories of tearing these perforated cards off the sheet and taping them to boxes of Sweethearts. Even the girls got cards of MJ.

They’re cheesy as hell, but now nearly a quarter century (let that sink in) they are a classic throwback.

Happy Valentines Day!

Thrift Treasures 64: The Premiere Editions

Posted in Thrift Treasures with tags , , , , , , on March 1, 2014 by Cardboard Icons

ThriftTreasuresLogoSo here’s a short Thrift Treasures post that’s been sitting in my queue for a while.  About two months ago while hunting treasures in the California’s south bay cities of Campbell and San Jose, I went to a Salvation Army that I only get to maybe once every two or three months,

Judging by the throngs of people I run into there, it’s definitely on the radar for treasure hunting folks. Sometimes it’s people looking for jewelry, other times its people seeking art or anything else they can flip on eBay.  I dabble in some of those areas as well, but head straight for sports stuff regardless of the circumstances.

During this trip, there were no cards. BUT there were two card-related items … which of course I had to own.  Which is why I am even writing this.

Granted these items were in the area designated by store employees as the “Collectibles” and their prices relative to the rest of the second-hand items int he store seem a tad inflated. But during my decade-plus of treasure seeking I’ve never seen these, so they were mine.

IMG_6825Here we have the first issue of Beckett Basketball featuring some player you may or may not heard. Michael Jordan graces the cover of the first every Beckett Basketball, which is the March/April 1990 issue.  These aren’t rare. You’ll find them at various card shows and on eBay of course.  But for $5.50 I figured I’d bite.  Especially since it was kept in pretty good shape.  The cover is stiff.   The articles inside talk about how the basketball card market has grown to a state where a magazine was warranted.  And of course there is the price guide.  I won’t go over everything, but I will answer the question that is on your mind: How much was the 1986-87 Fleer Michael Jordan rookie card worth then? Answer: $175, high book.

The other magazine t also cost me $5.50 is the premiere edition of the Topps Magazine.  Some of you may not have even been born — sad, but true — when Topps had its own Magazine. Well, here it is, the first edition — featuring Jose Canseco on the front.  The inside has a strip of cards that featured various players, primarily one George Kenneth Griffey Jr. and a pull-out poster showcasing every single one of the 792 cards that make up the 1990 Topps set.

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While there are all sorts of cool little tidbits in this magazine, it is worth noting that there is a short article on the highly-coveted 1990 Topps George H.W. Bush Yale.

IMG_6824In short, the story says that President Bush is a baseball fan, he played on the 1948 Yale University team that went to the College World Series, and Bush’s grandsons apparently asked someone why President Bush didn’t have a baseball card. Word got to Topps; Topps made just a few of the cards and delivered them to President Bush. The article says the cards are not for sale to the public and that they likely would never reach the secondary market.  The author does, however, speculate what collectors would pay for “the rarest baseball card Topps ever printed.”