Archive for rookie cards

Error found on 24-year-old card 

Posted in Misc. with tags , , , , , on June 23, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

I was going through a box of cards I bought at a thrift store recently for an upcoming Thrift Treasures post and came across a 1992 O-Pee-Chee Premier card of Mike Bordick, card 5 in the set.
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There’s Mike on the back of the card, a second-year issue. Bordick was a solid infielder for Oakland and later Baltimore.
So where’s the problem?

The front.
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That aint Mike. It’s actually Scott Brosius, who also had a solid career that includes three World Series Championship Rings, 1998-2000, and a World Series MVP trophy in 1998.

Brosius rookie cards are in 1992. So this is sort of a cameo rookie.

Another case of a missing Rookie Card Logo

Posted in Misc. with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 17, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

A decade ago, the official “rookie logo” was instilled into the baseball card world following a rule change that no longer allowed card companies to create cards of players who had yet to serve time in the Major Leagues.  Topps’ rules were slightly different as they were grandfathered into the hobby and via various Bowman branded products could produce “prospect” cards. This changed the definition of a “rookie card” for many people as some saw the prospect cards as nothing more than an insert, or pre-rookie card, akin to a minor league issue. The debate over what collectors really want continues to this day.

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But the Rookie Card Logo was also designed to make it easier for collectors, especially novice ones, to easily identify a real rookie card from a player’s second- or third-year card.For the most part Topps, the only company with a Major League Baseball Properties license, has done a good job using the logo when needed.  However, it has been abused in the sense that the logo has basically been slapped on ever rookie player’s non-rookie cards — like subsets, inserts and checklists bearing their photo and name.

But there have been instances where the company seemingly has flat out missed the opportunity to correctly use the Logo.

In 2015, Giants utility man/third baseman, and eventual runner up for National League Rookie of the Year, Matt Duffy was added to the Topps Update Series without a Rookie Card Logo. And to make that worse, they have added the Logo to his 2016 Gypsy Queen card.

It should be noted that Panini has a license to create baseball cards through the Majoe League Players Association and uses a variation of the Rookie Logo on their cards. The 2015 Duffy cards created by Panini in fact have the Panini version of the Rookie Logo.

The reason this comes to mind today is I pulled a 2016 Topps Gypsy Queen Byung-Ho Park rookie card this morning and guess what … it’s missing a logo.Park signed with the Twins in November and to date is his only Major League card.

Rookie Card Upgrade: 1960 Topps Willie McCovey 

Posted in Rookie Card Upgrade, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on March 15, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

I’m a big fan of Willie McCovey but I’ve never really been a huge fan of his 1960 Topps rookie card. Reason? It’s ugly.  The rendition of McCovey isn’t exactly flattering. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: McCovey looks like a deer on this card.

I digress. Being the rookie card collector that I am I had to own one. Hell, everyone should own one. The copy I decided on was raw and ultimately graded a 3.5.  It’s one of the best-looking 3.5’s I’d ever owned.  photo 76246699-8271-409C-B4BB-D5DA0E628931_zpsb2w1qcwh.jpg

Lately I’ve been doing a bunch of upgrading and recently posted my new Carl Yastrzemski. When I put that Yaz in my rookie display case next to the McCovey, it got me thinking about upgrading the Giants’ HOF rookie card.

And so I did. In relatively cheap fashion. in fact, it was maybe $20 more that what I had paid for the first McCovey.

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Rookie Card Upgrade: 1909-11 t206 Nap Lajoie

Posted in Rookie Card Upgrade with tags , , , , , on March 10, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

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One of the first authentic t206 cards I ever purchased was a Piedmont back portrait post of Hall of Famer Nap Lajoie. This was in 2009, I think. The card was in a PSA case and then I cracked it and had it merely authenticated (my request) by Beckett Grading Services, Vintage.  It sat in my display case for years but I always wanted to upgrade it.  And so I did.

Presenting a better looking, tougher back, different pose and old-school BVG with subs: a Polar Bear back Lajoie with bat! photo 5BAC6BF1-17AC-4342-A5D1-23AF10BBC9E8_zpsq2q0qn7h.jpg

In Memoriam: Dave Henderson (July 21, 1958- Dec. 27, 2015) 

Posted in In Memoriam with tags , , , , , on December 27, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

I loved watching this guy play.  I also went to school with his twin nieces. This saddens me tremendously.  This is his 1982 Topps rookie card. 

 

Pack-Pulled vs Industry Standard

Posted in Misc. with tags , , , , , on October 19, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

As a rookie card (and prospect) collector, it is a goal of mine to acquire early cards if every guy who has played in the Majors. It’s a daunting task that at times I struggle to adhere. With players from pre 2002, it was fairly simple to decide which card(s) I wanted to target.

In the last decade or so the lines between first, early, rookie card, prospect card, etc. have become blurred and there are any number of cards a collector could target.

As most of us know, Bowman Chrome autographs in any form are pretty much the industry standard.  But we also know, obviously, that many other brands exist. Which creates an interesting scenario when a collector who owns multiple cards of a single player.

Example: Jose Abreu.

  
Shortly after Abreu broke into the majors in 2014 I picked up this shown Bowman Chrome Prospects autograph on the secondary market. For all intents and purposes I was done with Abreu. And then Lo and Behold I bought a blaster of Bowman Platinum and pull the shown blue refractor Abreu auto.

Conventional wisdom would have this one of two ways: Keep both, or unload one and go add something else. The latter is where my head is considering I could turn one of these into another sogned rookie or prospect of a buy whom I do not have.

And so here is the true dilemma: Keep the Bowman Chrome autograph because it’s the industry standard, or the Bowman Platinum because It’s technically rarer (it is serial numbered to 199) and I personally pulled it?

A trip to LCS for supplies leads to purchase of vintage rookies

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, New Addition with tags , , , , , on September 21, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

So earlier today I was taking pictures of some autographs in my collection and noticed that I still needed about 30 single-screw cases for a project I’m working on.  So I headed to the LCS to buy these …

  
Well, I had about 20 minutes to spare and the shop owner tells me he got a bunch of 1940s and older cards in the showcase. 

So I dug through and saw lots of stuff I liked, but really two cards that I absolutely needed for my collection.

  
For less than the price of a hobby box I added two rookie cards of Boston Red Sox legends to my collection, cards that I had only seen online.  Both are considered lower grade, but I love that these were unexpected purchases made in person and from one of the local shops, which I like supporting. 

(Public Service Announcement: If you’ve got a shop near you, buy a single or two every month for your PC and help keep them in business.)

I only had a few minutes at the shop today because I had to get my kids from school, but I had just enough time afterward to take these Instagram pictures on the baseball field at my kids’ school.

1939 Play Ball Bobby Doerr, who at age 97 is presently the oldest living member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

 And 1941 Play Ball Dom DiMaggio, younger brother of The Yankee Clipper Joe DiMaggio, and a star in his own right.   

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