Archive for sports

I hope 2019 Bowman Mega Boxes are gone before I see them

Posted in Commentary with tags , , , , , on May 16, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

2019 Bowman Mega Boxes have begun to hit shelves — a week earlier than the advertised release date — and people in the hobby are going nuts trying to find these lottery tickets.

Personally, I hope they are gone before I see them.

Why? Don’t I like cards? Don’t I want a shot at pulling some ridiculously priced prospect card?

The answer to all of that is yes. And that’s MY problem.

I’ve got an addictive personality, and a serious case of FOMO — Fear Of Missing Out — so I tend to over extend myself on retail products I don’t even collect simply because that’s what’s hot, and I have this feeling that I must buy some (or all) if I actually locate it in the wild.

We’ve been breeding this culture that once you see it, you’ve got to buy it all. I know I am not the only one. Go look at your Twitter feed and message board posts and look at the number of people dropping $300-$500 on baskets full of Bowman Mega Boxes; go look at the walls of Mega Box Wax being shown off.

This isn’t the only product that gets us doing this, but it is the latest. Because we know that somewhere within these $20 boxes of surprise could be lying a card that might be worth (resell value) thousands, but we participate en mass knowing that most cards will be worth just a few quarters in most cases.

Personally, I know what I’ll do when and if I see these things. I’m sure I’ll buy two or three. And I’ll feel that excitement and rush as a I check out. And moments later that feeling will be gone after I open them, a replaced with the idea that “what if” I bought another two or three? And then the sickness continues.

Good luck to any and all who open Bowman Mega Boxes. I have no ill feelings toward any of you. Just do yourself a favor and make sure those boxes are FACTORY SEALED … we all know that only two packs in each box are really why you’re buying them, and if history has shown us anything, cheap-ass scammers can and will find a way to remove them from boxes.

Poor packaging, fingernail marks and a Kershaw Gold Rookie Card highlight mailday

Posted in Collecting Kershaw, Mail Day with tags , , , , , on May 10, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

I received two packages yesterday, both of which contained Clayton a Kershaw cards.

The first package I shared on a twitter as the packaging alone is almost post worthy. I acquired a 2019 Topps Opening Day Dirt relic card that the seller decided to ship only in a team bag taped to a piece of cardboard, all inside a padded envelope. No Top Loader. I wouldn’t bother bringing up the packaging if the seller had used a piece of cardboard on both side of the card, however that was not the case. This seller merely left one side — the top side — exposed to the bubble wrap and whatever case into contact with it. Folks, don’t do this.

The card is Ok, I suppose. Although I now wonder if it was done on purpose as a cover-up, or to build in an excuse for the dog marks on the surface of the card — you can see there are fingernail marks, a true sign this card was pulled by a not-so-careful packsearcher.

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The second package brought home a card I wasn’t sure I’d ever acquired. An inexperienced seller put up for auction a base 2008 Topps Update Kershaw Rookie Card along with a 2008 Topps Update Gold Border Kershaw Rookie serial numbered /2008. I managed to acquire the lot for the price of three blasters, which is a pretty decent deal considering the base Rookie often sells $40-$60 when Kershaw is healthy. True, the Gold has some issues on one corner — which is likely why some folks balked — but the two-Card lot made sense for me.

So I was thinking … A recommendation for Beckett Magazines

Posted in Commentary, Misc. with tags , , , , , , on May 8, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

A few weeks ago I picked up a copy of the newest Beckett Baseball. Don’t ask why. I just like to have a new copy in my hand every few months. I really only buy it once or twice a year.

Anyway, I was just flipping through the magazine as I normally would and it dawned on me that Beckett is missing an opportunity.

Hear me out.

A few years ago Beckett stopped publishing in its monthly magazine any set released before 1980. The move was done to keep a more modern presence and to reduce the size, and maybe the cost, of the monthly magazine. I get it.

So here’s my idea. Why don’t we trim out all this nonsense like the 3-inch listing of 1990 Fleer and just list key cards going all the way back to t206? I mean seriously. Not to pick on Ozzie Smith or Robin Yount, but we don’t need to know that those cards are listed at 15 to 40 cents in the book.

What’d be more valuable is seeing key rookie cards and even other major HOFers from vintage sets from t206 to 1980; and then list other key rookies and some inserts from 1980 to current. Don’t you all think it’s a bit asinine that a person returning to the hobby can’t buy a copy of the monthly magazine and see what year or how much a rookie card of Mantle, Mays or Aaron is, but can go find damn near every 1990 card of George Brett or Greg Maddux?

And this is not a forum for you to blast the magazine. I know — hell, we all know it’s not as valuable to the hobby as it used to be — rather this post is a suggestion to improve the product, and maybe help find a way for it to be useful in today’s market.

Sometimes you just gotta buy it

Posted in Box / Pack Break with tags , , , , , on May 7, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

After dropping off the kids at school on Monday I stopped at a Walgreens nearby in search of one of the Walgreens exclusive 2019 Topps Series 1 hanger packs. I’ve seen shelf space for them at two different stores but to date I have yet to actually see any of the packs in person.

This Walgreens didn’t have any of the yellow exclusive packs, but they did get a new batch of the 100-card repack boxes priced at $4.99. I know some people swear by these and buy them often. I often don’t buy them and just walk away … unless something showing on the front intrigues me.

On this date I was intrigued … by a 1987 Fleer Roger Clemens card.

I could have walked away. I mean I already have a copy of this Clemens card in my collection. And for $5 I could buy a dozen of these. But it’s not every day that you see a 30-plus old card of your favorite player on the front of a repack, so it almost feels like an omen when you find one in the wild. So I had to own it … right?

As luck would have it, there were actually TWO identical 87 Fleer Clemens in the box, so now I have an extra, one I shall give to my son for his collection.

How about the remainder of the box?

Started strong with a cool 1987 Fleer Limited Dale Murphy right behind the Clemens cards.

A solid vintage 1979 Topps Julio Cruz. Condition is great condition. Yes, it’s just a common, just nice to see I. A repack.

I’ve always been a fan of the early 1990s Minor League releases.

I bet it’d be fun to be a Jim Edmonds collector. He was a great defender and his actions were often captured on his cards, like this 1998 Topps release.

Oh look, it’s a chrome prospect auto. I guess I got the 1:4 box hit. Luebke was a solid MLB pitcher for a year or two, totaling 200 Ks and a near 3.50 ERA over his brief career.

Bro, it’s Steve Balboni and his mustache on bright white paper stock used for the 1989 Topps Traded set. You know I have to post that.

This 1991 Donruss Diamond King Edgar Martinez ain’t worth much of anything, but Inhave always been a fan of these. This was the last of the basic Diamond Kings before Donruss turned them into chase cards the following year.

Fred McGriff on this 1990 Fleer Card looks like he is ready to break into his patented finger point like he did in the Tom Emanski baseball video.

Oh look, it’s a 1997 Leaf Cody Bellinger Card … I bet these are 1 in every box now.

Here’s a 2018 Topps Indians team set Yan Gomes Card. I have a cool piece coming up that touches in Yan Gones and his concussion-like symptom from a few years ago.

This Gregg Jefferies Future Stars Card from 1989 Topps is one of my childhood favorites. It may be worthless, but it made me smile.

The sealed pack in this box was a 1990 Upper a deck that was very uneventful, save for a Bo Jackson All-Star Card.

There are dozens of other cards in the box, but we’ll wrap this up with three 2011 Topps Update cards, which suggests that perhaps maybe … and I mean maybe … there is a box out there containing one of Mike Trout’s Topps Update rookie cards

Was it “worth” the $4.99? Depends. The resell value probably isn’t there, but trips down memory lane are always fun and sometimes priceless.

Kershaw 2018 NLCS Game 5 First Pitch game-used ball added to collection

Posted in Collecting Kershaw, Game-Used Items, Misc. with tags , , , , , on April 19, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

When it comes to sports collectibles, baseball cards will always be my first love.

But in today’s collectibles climate, MLB authenticated game-used baseballs just might be the new hot girlfriend who may be a better partner than the first wife.

And this week, that new girlfriend arrived looking finer than any of the girls that came before.

This week the mailman came through with a massive mailday that contained a purchase I made last week. The contents? THE baseball that Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw used to start Game 5 of the National League Championship Series.

Kershaw is my dude. My guy. My favorite active player. And last year I was lucky enough to witness in person an almost improbable collision of worlds when Kershaw faced off against my favorite team, the Boston Red Sox, in Game 5 of the World Series.

True, the outcome was not what Kershaw would have wanted. But that did mean that the Sox did clinch a world title in Dodger Stadium while I was present.

But the road for the Dodgers to get there that night was something that I, as a Kershaw fan and collector, would not forget. And his start in Game 5 of the NLCS, during which the southpaw would strike out 9 Milwaukee Brewers over 7 innings en route to his 9th career post season victory (and the last to date), was something that Dodger fans absolutely needed to see from their ace.

The performance in the NLCS helped set LA up for a second straight World Series appearance, and was one that eventually would lead to the aforementioned dream scenario of me seeing my favorite player gave off against my favorite team with all the marbles in the line

I’m not going to kid myself. This newly acquired baseball isn’t the dream ball I’m still chasing. I absolutely NEED to acquire a Kershaw-thrown ball from Game 5 of the World Series. But this NLCS Ball is something I could not pass up when I noticed it up for sale recently.

There had been two other Kershaw-related NLCS balls posted on eBay for sale. One was actually the second ball used during Game 5 against the Brewers and the other was used during the at-bat in which Kershaw walked during a plate appearance against Brandon Wooddruff.

But the ball I bought trumped all of that as it is THE ball that Kershaw used to warm up, then thrown for the first pitch (a 90 mph fastball) and then a bouncing slider to Milwaukee lead-off hitter Lorenzo Cain.

2019 Topps Kershaw Printing Plate added to collection

Posted in Collecting Kershaw with tags , , , , , on April 16, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

The last few weeks have been so busy that I haven’t been documenting/sharing a ton of stuff here. I have this stack of Clayton Kershaw cards on my desk that I’ve been meaning to sort. Along the highlights is this 2019 Topps Series One Yellow Printing Plate.

I still enjoy printing plates from time to time, even if the majority of the hobby has moved away from them. But honesty, others going in a different direction just means I’m more likely to acquire them at a cheaper price.

The 2019 base Topps card is also amusing because it’s an image from Opening Day 2018 and Kershaw’s zippier is down, something I noted just says before the product was released.

Next-Level disrespect for the base card

Posted in Commentary with tags , , , , , on April 4, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

Over the last few years there has been a trend among some persons in our hobby, a practice that has involved using base cards as packing materials to help protect the key card in a package.

Usually the practice involves a single key card in a top loader and then one or two — or more — base cards places on both sides of the top loader as them all of those cards places within a team bag.

When so first saw it, so had mixed feelings as it was clear that the base cards had been relegated to being nothing more than packaging materials. But alas they also were kind of extra fun items that could evoke emotion.

I let it go.

And then this happened this week.

The base cards were TAPED directly to the top loader with scotch tape. The base cards had zero chance to survive.

I know these are your cards and you’ll do as you will with them. But this is definitely some next-level disrespect for some base cards, let alone ones from such a classic set such as 1987 Donruss. it’s gut wrenching to some degree.