Archive for Stadium Club

The kids will get to see Kershaw pitch

Posted in Collecting Kershaw, Misc. with tags , , , , , , on June 7, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

Today is a special day. Los Angeles Dodgers star pitcher Clayton Kershaw is set to take the mound tonight at Oracle Park, home of the rival San Francisco Giants, and not only will I be there to see the future Hall of Famer take the mound, but so will my kids and my nephew.

The Points are Poop gang will finally get to watch the player whose cards they see all over my home, the player whose game-used items and cards are frequently arriving by mail, and the guy whose picture I took in 2015 and had the image printed on canvas and eventually hung in my hallway.

This will be my fourth time seeing my favorite player pitch. My sister and I saw him in 2015 as he locked down the NL West title in San Francisco in what was scheduled to be a pitchers duel against Madison Bumgarner. Kershaw was masterful that night, allowing just one hit and striking out 13 batters. It was at that game I took the aforementioned photo I had printed on canvas, and it is also the game at which the image used on this 2016 Stadium Club Gold Autograph card was snapped.

I saw Kershaw again last season when the Dodgers came through Oakland; and of course My sister and I saw him at Game 5 of the World Series at Dodger Stadium when my favorite team knocked around my favorite player in order to clinch the World Series Championship.

If this was just me going, I would have ponied up for seats along the first base line, but with three kids going with me, the budget just doesn’t allow for such premium seats. Instead we’ll be taking the game in from the bleachers.

Kershaw may not be the dominant pitcher he was five years ago, and I won’t pretend that he is the best in the game — pretty sure Max Scherzer has that title at the moment — but it’s pretty special for me to bring my kids and my sister’s son to a game that features my favorite active player.

By comparison, I only saw Roger Clemens — my childhood favorite — pitch twice, once on Opening Day 1999, which his first start with New York, and again in 2007 as a member of the Houston Astros. My ex wife was with me on both occasions.

I did have loose plans to see him in 1997 when the Blue Jays came through Oakland in May of that year, but I had a medical emergency right around my birthday that prevented that from happening — I wound up watching that game from a hospital bed. And in the early to mid 1990s I really didn’t have the means to see him as the Red Sox ace, which is unfortunate.

Rare, non-serial numbered parallels get lost in the shuffle

Posted in Collecting Kershaw, Commentary with tags , , , , , on June 6, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

As a player collector, it’s fun (sometimes) to chase down parallels. In most Topps brands, we can expect there to be some sort of gold parallel and then of course a refractor and variations thereof. Sometimes those cards are serial numbered to match the year, or much lower, say to 5, 10, 25, etc.

But in Stadium Club, Topps has gotten back to an early parallel called “First Day Issue” … and they’re rare, but often forgotten about because they’re not serial numbered.

Topps began releasing the First Day parallels in the early 1990s, and those parallels initially had a holographic logo emblazoned on the front of what looked like a base card. And then in the late 1990s the company moved to a a gold foil logo. The idea — at least in my mind — was to signify a certain batch of cards that were made during the first run the product and then inserted as a parallel of the base card.

In the last half decade or so, Topps brought the parallel back and made them much tougher to pull. And much like the late 1990s Topps used a foil emblem on the front to signify this parallel. Pretty cool, right? One problem: The cards are supposedly limited to like seven copies and they’re not serial numbered.

This means sellers may not know what they actually have, so they may not bother listing them, so they’re missing an opportunity to make money.

But on the flip side, player collectors tend to get them cheaper than other rare parallels solely because they’re not serial numbered.

I hope that when Topps releases Stadium Club in the upcoming months that the First Day Issue returns, and that they are rare, and I hope they begin serial numbering them … even if it means I’ll be paying more for the latest Kershaw.

Rookie Card parallel featuring rookie jersey serial number … sorta

Posted in Collecting Kershaw with tags , , , , , , on March 1, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

When it comes to Clayton Kershaw, there is one jersey number he will forever be remembered for wearing … and it’s 22.

But truth be told, he not only has worn 22. He has worn 54 for the Dodgers during his rookie season, and he has worn 46 and 75 as documented on various 2006-2008 Topps products.

The other day while checking for newly listed Kershaw cards on eBay I came across a tough rookie-year parallel, a 2008 Stadium Club Blue Photographer’s Proof parallel of Kershaw’s TSC rookie card. The card is serial numbered 75/99 … the 75 is significant because that is the jersey number Kershaw is wearing on his 2008 Topps Allen & Ginter and Topps Update rookie cards, among others.

For what it’s worth, I had only seen one other of this parallel card on eBay in recent history and it is still priced way more than I wanted to pay. But when this one popped up at a lower Buy It Now price and with a Best Offer option, I shot over an offer and within 20 minutes had negotiated a purchase price for about half of what the original BIN was. The card arrived earlier this week.

Regardless of the serial number, I decided the card was going to me mine. But the fact that this card had a serial number with some “importance” makes it a bit sweeter.

Player collectors have different methods for their madness. They sometimes only collect base cards, or chase the hits. And when it comes to serial numbered cards they sometimes can be very specific about THE one they need to own. I’m not entirely biased in that way, but I will often shop for a serial number that is appealing, and will pay a slight premium for cards featuring the serial number matching the player’s jersey number. In the case of this Stadium Club rookie parallel, I admit it’s a bit of a stretch, but it is a nice bonus to own this tougher find with a serial number matching the jersey number Kershaw is wearing on one of his significant rookie cards — it’s just too bad he’s not shown on this specific card wearing that number. Then again, if that were the case, I might have been able to get this card at the price I was able to negotiate.

Trade of base dupes leads to PC items, and bonuses

Posted in Mail Day with tags , , , , , , on February 16, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

I enjoy when I buy product to build a set and then take my duplicates and find a trading partner who needs a good chunk of them for a set they’re building on their own. What makes that process even more gratifying is when the partner has cards I need for my PC.

Such was the case recently when Scott (@saadams81) showed me a list of the 2019 Topps cards he needed. I was able to locate 66 cards he needed for his set. Scott had two Kershaw insets from 2019 Topps that I needed, and I inquired whether he had any of the guys I collect. He managed to have a few more Kershaw and Roger Clemens cards I needed for my PC.

My packaged arrived to him first, and his was delayed coming to me due to bad weather. But when the package arrived I was thrilled to find the cards we agreed upon, as well as two bonuses …

Scott was very generous in sending these two Stadium Club autos of Jharel Cotton and Matt Olson. Whats great is baseball season is around the corner and both guys are with Oakland still, and we’ll be seeing plenty of them as the season gets under way. Both cards will go into my son’s baseball binder.

Thanks again, Scott. I’m sure we’ll continue trading in the future.

Breaking a lonely 2017 TSC Baseball Value Pack

Posted in Box / Pack Break with tags , , , , , , , on July 22, 2017 by Cardboard Icons

I’ve always been a fan of Topps Stadium Club.  You can count me among the collectors who paid through the nose for singles of our favorite players from the original release in 1991. True story, I once road my bike three miles to drop $5 on a single Roger Clemens card from this set. Yes, that’s how it went when I was 11.

I digress, this year’s Stadium Club has been nearly impossible to find at retail. And I have not had time to hit my Local Card Shop to buy a hobby box.  Like most 2017 products that contain Aaron Judge, TSC has flown off the shelves.

But while shopping at WalMart with my son I managed to find a lonely Value Pack hanging on a peg hook. I had to snatch it up as it could be the one and only TSC pack I break this year.

And so, here are my results.


I did not pull any Aaron Judge cards, BUT I did pull a Andrew Benintendi rookie card, which features a cool photo of him robbing a homerun.


Other rookies in the pack included ones of Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Tyler Glasnow and Renato Nunez of the Oakland Athletics.


Baseball legend Ted Williams always manages to find himself in this set, which is great because I love me some Teddy Ballgame. That said, the image used on his card this year made me stop immediately. It’s fantastic. Ted seemingly is doing push-ups in the outfield and there is a building in the background, making him seem larger than life. Great photo choice.


My lone insert in the pack is a “Scoreless Streak” Justin Verlander. Ho-hum, in my opinion. The reverse of the card mentions several dominant streaks by Verlander but doesn’t touch at all on anything from 2016. Go figure.


The remainder of the pack features a random mix of players, including Salvador Perez, Joe Panik, Trayce Thompson, Albert Almora, Adam Conley, a random appearance by Derrek Lee and a gold parallel of JJ Hardy.

It’s probably a good thing there was only one pack on the shelf. I have a tendency to mark out for TSC and likely would have bought more.  If I see some in the wild, I’ll probably consider purchasing more, but it’s not exactly something I’m going to go way out of my way for right now.

If anyone has any Clayton Kershaw cards from this set or any others, I’m openly trading for them — just don’t ask for any autos or hits in exchange.

’16 Stadium Club & ’15 Prism box breaks

Posted in Box / Pack Break, Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 15, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

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I won a gift certificate from Blowout Cards earlier this year and it’d been sitting in my account for months.  I decided to use it last week and just a few days ago the boxes arrived. I love Stadium Club and Prizm offered two autos per box at a discounted price so it seemed like a decent buy.  Here are the results.

I’ll say this upfront. Panini America’s Prism is always fun to open, although I think we’d all like it more if the cards had logos. I like the design,  the quality of the cards and I the parallels. These boxes have two autos and four numbered parallels per box.  I did OK given the price point.  My autos were James McCann and Addison Russell, which was a parallel. My parallels included a Barry Bonds /125, Stephen Strasburg /99 and Cole Hamels /42.

 photo 1FDB2955-9BBF-4EA4-835C-9DC814AC92ED_zpsey0opswu.jpgThe real reason I decided to order the cards was because I really like Stadium Club. I love the photos, which is what brings be back to the product every year that Topps decides to bring it back.  As you know, each box contains two autographs and a slew of parallels and inserts.  My haul wasn’t half bad.  The autos included one of a young Mets pitcher Steven Matz whose signature I didn’t already own, and my parallels were solid — black parallels of Corey Seager and Babe Ruth, gold Mike Trout.  And I pulled one of those tough (1:256 packs) Triumvirate Illuminators (Prince Fielder) and a photo variation of Greg Maddux.

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2016 Stadium Club Clayton Kershaw is my new favorite card

Posted in Misc., Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , on July 8, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

Being a card collector, new cards releases of my favorite players always bring joy into my life.  Roger Clemens will forever be my favorite player, but Clayton Kershaw is my second favorite. And his 2016 Stadium Club card is now my new favorite card.

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Take a look at this card and you see Kershaw celebrating with catcher AJ Ellis.  A keen Dodger fan knows this exact moment when the two embraced at the conclusion of Kershaw’s one-hit, 13-strikeout performance against the San Francisco Giants on Sept. 30, 2015, to clinch the National League West title on enemy territory — at AT&T Park.

I am not a Dodger fan. I am a Red Sox fan. But why is THIS card my new favorite?

Because I was there. And I also captured this moment from near the Giants’ bullpen along left field.

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It was a magical performance by Kershaw, who got the best of the Giants who were led into the game by their ace Madison Bumgarner. It was billed as a pitching classic from the start and while Bumgarner wasn’t great that night, Kershaw definitely was and now I will not only remember the performance based on what I saw, or the pictures I took, I will remember it with the assistance of this Topps Stadium Club card.