Archive for t206

Rookie Card Upgrade: 1909-11 t206 Christy Mathewson

Posted in Rookie Card Upgrade with tags , , , , on March 2, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

So, as you are probably aware no cards produced before 1933 are technically classified as rookie cards.  That said, I have sort of adopted the t206 set as my go-to for many of the early stars of the game, such as Christy Mathewson. 

I purchased this ratty Mathewson in 2007.  It may have actually been my very first t206 card. 
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It served as a place holder in my collection until one day I could fond a suitable upgrade. Well, I found it.

Welcome to the collection my new Mathewson, graded a 3 (with subs!) by BVG.
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As for the older Mathewson, it already has a new home waiting for it. Hopefully the new owner enjoys it as much as I did. 

An alternative to THE Honus Wagner t206 card has arrived

Posted in Hall of Famers, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on February 27, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

Like many of you, the 1909-11 t206 Honus Wagner is considered the Holy Grail of Sportscards.  It’s such a rare card that even in the worst condition an authentic copy costs about as much as a house.

Well, I’ve come to terms with the fact that unless I managed to unearth one of these Wagners during a trip to a garage sale or a thrift store I’ll never own one.

So where does that leave me, a collector who aims to get the rookie card or a very early card of every Hall of Famer? It basically sends me looking for alternatives.

Wagner has quite a few options.  I could’ve settled for the 1948-49 Leaf card that is a bit more common but I actually don’t like that card because it’s hideous and was produced like 40 years after his iconic card.  And most of the Wagner tobacco era cards — the non-t206 ones — still go for upward of four figures.  I mean it’s Honus freakin’ Wagner, a hobby giant, I would expect nothing less.

But then I found what I have deemed to be a much cheaper alternative: the 1909-11 Colgan’s Chips card/disc. photo E478CD75-2D36-4881-8877-9DE6778B4000_zpsrjnl8lmu.jpg

It may not have corners, but this item has a few things going for it. First off, if that pose looks familiar that’s because it’s the same one used on the legendary Wagner. Secondly, it hails from 1909-11, the same era as the hobby’s most expensive card. And third, it’s an item that was distributed in GUM packages instead of cigarettes.

Part of the reason the t206 Wagner is worth so much is because it was pulled from circulation at the request of Wagner who reportedly didn’t like his name being associated with tobacco. So the fact that this was a gum card adds some charm as Wagner likely approved of this.  Also, gum and baseball cards haven one hand in hand for much of the hobby’s history. 

This is my first true vintage Honus Wagner and in a few days I will unseal it from its SGC case and send it to Dallas, Texas, so that it can be slabbed by Beckett Grading. Upon its return, it will fit nicely in my graded card display case.

You don’t go to the post office at 6 a.m. for just any card 

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, Hall of Famers, Mail Day with tags , , , , on October 14, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

Yesterday I posted about my 1933 Goudey Jim Bottomley card that arrived in the mail.  There should have been a second card as part of that mail day, but no one was home to sign for it.

So the postman left a note saying so could pick up the item anytime after 6 a.m. the next day.

I was there 15 minutes early.

Behold, perhaps the best looking low grade t206 you may ever see, the newest addition to my collection, a 1909-11 t206 Tris Speaker.

  
One look at this card and you may wonder why it graded a 1.5. The front is drop-dead gorgeous. Fantastic centering and bright colors. Decent corners for a century-old card.

The back is why it graded so low.  But even with the paperloss, the back isn’t that bad and when this thing is in my showcase, no one will be looking at the back.

  

Debate: Crack and submit or leave as is

Posted in Misc. with tags , , , , , , , on February 8, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

So, I threw this out on Twitter earlier but figured I’d add it here as well. Curious how you’d proceed with this. At this moment I am uncertain what I will do.

Here’s the issue: I own a T206 Roger Bresnahan card that is graded a GAI 1, Poor. Bresnahan is a Hall of Famer. I collect Hall of Famers. I also prefer Beckett Grading to any other grading service I am already submitting cards to Beckett Grading this week, so I could add this to my package

Here’s the hang up. Look at the slab it’s in. The label inside notes that this is the first Bresnahan T206 graded by GAI.

Do I crack the GAI case and destroy what is the only one in existence like this, or proceed to BVG and have it more uniform with the rest of my BGS items?

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Instagram Portrait: 1909-11 T206 Walter Johnson / 2010 Topps Chrome Refractor Autographs Stephen Strasburg

Posted in Instagram Portraits with tags , , , , , , , on July 26, 2012 by Cardboard Icons

“We’ve come a long way …”

Cardboard Porn: 1909-1911 T206 Ty Cobb (Red Port.)

Posted in Cardboard Porn with tags , , , , , , , , on July 22, 2010 by Cardboard Icons

Cardboard Porn: Because sometimes words just get in the way.

This is the 10th in an on-going series of card images titled “Cardboard Porn.”

Forget 2009 Topps 206, let’s see the real thing!

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 9, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

I’ve been on a binge lately with 2009 Topps 206. The reason I love these cards so much is because they remind me of the real deal for 100 years ago.

Fortunately, I own two copies of the original cards, two of the biggest stars of the period, Christy Mathewson and Nap LaJoie. I received these cards back from Beckett Grading on Tuesday and they are even nicer than they were two weeks ago when I cracked them from their less-superior PSA and SGC cases. The Mathewson is a Sweet Caporal back while the LaJoie features the more common Piedmont back, a design Topps used for the common backs for its 2009 minis. I do have a question for Topps though: Is the company looking to produce this set again in 2010? The original T-206s were distributed in 1909 AND 1911.

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