Archive for tobacco cards

BCW 20 Pocket vs Ultra Pro 15 Pocket pages (Tobacco cards)

Posted in Project Organize with tags , , , , , , , on January 11, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

As part of Project Organize I began the other day a painstaking process in which I had to remove tobacco size cards from existing sleeves and then move them around for a slew of other similar size cards I’d accumulated over the last four years.

In 2014 I learned there were binder pages for these cards and at the time I had most of them stowed away. The pages I bought then from my LCS were 15-pocket sheets made by Ultra Pro

Fast forward to Black Friday 2018 and Blowout Cards had a box of 100 tobacco sheets made by BCW on sale so I decided to throw on one of those in my cart of purchases at the time.

It really wasn’t until yesterday that I realized I had a problem — I had stacks of binder pages of different sizes, and both had their pros and cons.

As mentioned earlier, the first pages I bought were from my LCS and were made by Ultra Pro. These high-quality pages accommodate for 15 cards, or three rows of five across. The pro is the pages are gorgeous when full. The con here is that the pockets are really, really deep. So if you need to shuffle stuff around you really need to work to get the tobacco size card out of the sheet.

When I opened my BCW box I noticed immediately the quality of the sheet was more rigid, but not so much that it resembled some inferior sheets from the early 1990s — so it’s still good for the cards. The pros with these sheets is you do get 20 cards per page, so you’ll need less. AND the cards are much easier to remove and then move around. The major con here is that the pockets are actually not tall enough to cover the entire card. If you look closely, the top border is exposed, which isn’t a problem for rows 2,3 and 4. But that top row is exposed to whatever may come in contact with the page.

On a side note, if you end up with BOTH brands in a binder it makes for a really odd look.

Part of me wants to stick to one brand, but fact is I own probably 100 sheets of each brand, and I’m not in a position to ditch one brand in favor of another. I’ll just have to ride this out. But I am curious what you other collectors think about these two products, which of the two you prefer and why? Neither is perfect, but they both do a good enough job to house most of these tobacco size cards.

There is an alternative, but it’s an expensive one: Buy a boat-load of the Tobacco size top loader “penny sleeve” sleeves and then use typical 9-pocket pages. But I believe those Tobacco-size “penny sleeves” are not a penny … I think you get a pack of 25 for like $3.

Deuces Don Drysdale rookie …

Posted in Hall of Famers, Misc. with tags , , , , , , , on January 13, 2018 by Cardboard Icons

If you’re not familiar with the primary focus of my collection, I’ve been acquiring the Rookie Card or a tobacco-era card of every member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Wagner. Ruth. Mantle. Etc. And on top of that, the card has to be stabbed by Beckett Grading Services because I like uniformity.

This week I added to my collection a 1909-11 t206 John McGraw already stabbed by BGS/BVG. Low grade, but still wonderful to see.

It’s so much fun adding these century-old cards to the wall display. It’s a lot more fun adding these baseball icons than chasing something new and flashy. But that’s just my opinion.

So now the McGraw will be inserted in the top row — to keep things chronological — and since the Drysdale is the last card in the case it has to be moved.

So what happens with the Drysdale? It’ll get bumped to the second graded card display which presently houses stabbed HOF rookies from 1958-1991.

I’ll need another case eventually as I have a half dozen more ungraded HOF t206 that need BGS/BVG cases. This will eventually force the move of Jim Bunning and Bill Mazeroski as well.

Ben,

Collector of Hall of Fame tobacco era and Rookie cards.

Collector of Roger Clemens and Clayton Kershaw.

You can reach me on Twitter and Instagram @cardboardicons. You can also e-mail me at cardboardicons@yahoo.com

An alternative to THE Honus Wagner t206 card has arrived

Posted in Hall of Famers, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on February 27, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

Like many of you, the 1909-11 t206 Honus Wagner is considered the Holy Grail of Sportscards.  It’s such a rare card that even in the worst condition an authentic copy costs about as much as a house.

Well, I’ve come to terms with the fact that unless I managed to unearth one of these Wagners during a trip to a garage sale or a thrift store I’ll never own one.

So where does that leave me, a collector who aims to get the rookie card or a very early card of every Hall of Famer? It basically sends me looking for alternatives.

Wagner has quite a few options.  I could’ve settled for the 1948-49 Leaf card that is a bit more common but I actually don’t like that card because it’s hideous and was produced like 40 years after his iconic card.  And most of the Wagner tobacco era cards — the non-t206 ones — still go for upward of four figures.  I mean it’s Honus freakin’ Wagner, a hobby giant, I would expect nothing less.

But then I found what I have deemed to be a much cheaper alternative: the 1909-11 Colgan’s Chips card/disc. photo E478CD75-2D36-4881-8877-9DE6778B4000_zpsrjnl8lmu.jpg

It may not have corners, but this item has a few things going for it. First off, if that pose looks familiar that’s because it’s the same one used on the legendary Wagner. Secondly, it hails from 1909-11, the same era as the hobby’s most expensive card. And third, it’s an item that was distributed in GUM packages instead of cigarettes.

Part of the reason the t206 Wagner is worth so much is because it was pulled from circulation at the request of Wagner who reportedly didn’t like his name being associated with tobacco. So the fact that this was a gum card adds some charm as Wagner likely approved of this.  Also, gum and baseball cards haven one hand in hand for much of the hobby’s history. 

This is my first true vintage Honus Wagner and in a few days I will unseal it from its SGC case and send it to Dallas, Texas, so that it can be slabbed by Beckett Grading. Upon its return, it will fit nicely in my graded card display case.

THE Cardboard Icon

Posted in Instagram Portraits with tags , , , , on January 11, 2013 by Cardboard Icons

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New Addition: 1909-1911 T206 Cy Young

Posted in New Addition with tags , , , , on December 26, 2011 by Cardboard Icons

Been kind of slow here at Cardboard Icons.  I have so many ideas and thoughts, yet so little time to express them or execute them.  But that’s not t0o say that I have not been busy on the card scene.

I’ve been actively trading on the Topps Diamond Giveaway Site, CheckOutMyCards.com. and of course eBay.  I have to say, collecting is pretty easy (and fun) when all you have to do is click a few buttons to buy, sell and trade.

Over the last two months I have added about 400 rookie cards to my collection, all of which I plan to showcase here at some point.  But one card I do want to show off is my latest vintage (un-official) rookie card: 1909-1911 T206 Cy Young.

T-206 cards are not considered rookies, partly because they were released over a three year span, but for purposes of my collection, these decade-old tobacco cards serve as “rookies.”

This Cy Young is probably the nicest “poor” grade authentic and unaltered t206 card I’ve seen, let alone purchased.  I own a Ty Cobb from the same set, also graded a 1,  and they are light years away in terms of actual condition.

I’d been seeking a good-looking, decently priced Cy Young for years.  When the opportunity came to own this one for less than the price of others I had been watching, I knew I had to snatch it up.  It’ll look great next to my other original T206s: Christy Mathewson, Nap Lajoie, and of course Ty Cobb.

Newspaper columnist boils tobacco cards. Ethical? I don’t mind.

Posted in Newspaperman with tags , , , , on August 13, 2010 by Cardboard Icons

Just saw an interesting video shot by a columnist for The Trentonian in New jersey. In short, the writer found 70 1909-1911 tobacco cards featuring flags of the world (Think Allen & Ginter) and they were glued to a piece of cardboard. In the writer’s quest to separate the cards, he tried to freeze them as well as hold them over steam, to no avail. In the end he threw the cards into boiling water and the things separated cleanly. He then dried the cards for three days by placing them between heavy books.

The column he writes is an interesting one as it evokes the question: Was this ethical?

Given that I collect a decent amount of vintage — most of which is in bad shape — I figured I’d tackle this issue from my prospective.

Honestly, this practice doesn’t bother me one bit.

We’re talking about a century-old card that was nearly destroyed by its previous owner who glued it to another piece of cardboard, presumably to showcase these flags. If someone can find a way to remove the card and salvage it from being one step closer to being recycled, then more power to them.

I understand that some consider this altering the card, but to me it definitely is on the lower end of the spectrum if you want to call it that. For me, he has not trimmed the edges, nor has he resurfaced/recolored the picture, background or border, so to me it doesn’t matter much at all.

Would a grading company be able to detect such a tactic? Depends … not many cards can be placed in water and come out looking untouched.

Having said that, if the card were for MY collection, I’d love to pay a slightly discounted price for a card that looks great. Sure as hell beats a card that’s attached to some other nonsense. And if no one ever informed me of how the card came to be, I wouldn’t mind either, so long as the card is authentic and not a reprint.

You can watch the video here

Cardboard Porn: 1909-1911 T206 Ty Cobb (Red Port.)

Posted in Cardboard Porn with tags , , , , , , , , on July 22, 2010 by Cardboard Icons

Cardboard Porn: Because sometimes words just get in the way.

This is the 10th in an on-going series of card images titled “Cardboard Porn.”