Archive for vintage

A new quirk for 2019 Topps Heritage?

Posted in Commentary with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 2, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

The Topps Heritage line is a fun set to collect or view from afar each year. For the most part, Topps stays true to the original design and quirks, often mimicking the errors of the past to maintain that sense of nostalgia that’ve come to embrace over the years

Of course in recent memory they’ve also added a slew of variations to make for extreme chase cards in some cases. But today I think I found a new tradition, one that doesn’t appear to be a throwback to the 1970 set.

While sorting a bit of the Heritage that I picked up this week I noticed something that doesn’t appear to be an homage to the original set. Grab your stacks of Heritage and thumb through them and pull out your base cards of the Washington Nationals and Colorado Rockies. Remember, I’m talking base cards, not the multi-player rookie cards of subsets.

Now turn them over and look at the bio box.

Do you see it?

Right below the player’s biographical information is the team name: Washington Nationals or Colorado Rockies. Now go look at the other card backs. You’ll notice that cards of the other teams don’t have the team name on back.

I asked a hobby friend of mine what the deal was with this and he seemed to not know about it, suggesting that maybe it was a wink to something from 1970. I figured that may have been the case too, so I looked and I did not see the team name on the back of the 1970 cards.

I also noticed something else … a handful of the Nationals cards in the 2019 set (cards 1-400 not the SPs 401-500) corresponded by number with cards of the Washington Senators and Minnesota Twins from the 1970 set, which is a fun hat tip since there is some lineage between the Senators-Twins-Nationals franchises and locations.

Have you noticed any other fun quirks to the 2019 Heritage set? Leave a comment below.

Rookie Card Upgrade: 1971 Topps Dave Concepcion

Posted in Rookie Card Upgrade with tags , , , , , on February 14, 2016 by Cardboard Icons

I’ve been doing quite a bit of upgrading over the last few months. One of the cards I upgraded somewhat recently was m 1971 Topps Dave Concepcion rookie card.  The 1971 set is a really tough set to get in good condition.  Those black borders make the cards susceptible to chipping, which was a major problem for my original Concepcion:

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I didn’t pay much for the raw conception, but was always open for an upgrade. And then came along an opportunity for a Beckett Graded slabbed copy that looked really nice. The cost was actually not much more than what it would have cost just to have any card graded. That’s a big win for a key member of those great Reds teams of the 1970s.
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A trip to LCS for supplies leads to purchase of vintage rookies

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, New Addition with tags , , , , , on September 21, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

So earlier today I was taking pictures of some autographs in my collection and noticed that I still needed about 30 single-screw cases for a project I’m working on.  So I headed to the LCS to buy these …

  
Well, I had about 20 minutes to spare and the shop owner tells me he got a bunch of 1940s and older cards in the showcase. 

So I dug through and saw lots of stuff I liked, but really two cards that I absolutely needed for my collection.

  
For less than the price of a hobby box I added two rookie cards of Boston Red Sox legends to my collection, cards that I had only seen online.  Both are considered lower grade, but I love that these were unexpected purchases made in person and from one of the local shops, which I like supporting. 

(Public Service Announcement: If you’ve got a shop near you, buy a single or two every month for your PC and help keep them in business.)

I only had a few minutes at the shop today because I had to get my kids from school, but I had just enough time afterward to take these Instagram pictures on the baseball field at my kids’ school.

1939 Play Ball Bobby Doerr, who at age 97 is presently the oldest living member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

 And 1941 Play Ball Dom DiMaggio, younger brother of The Yankee Clipper Joe DiMaggio, and a star in his own right.   

Return trip to the LCS vintage bargain boxes and more

Posted in Vintage Bargain Bins with tags , , , , , , , , on August 14, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

I used to do this more often but my work schedule doesn’t always allow me to get to the local card shop, Stevens Creek Sports Cards, that has a wide array of vintage cards, including a load of “price-friendly” boxes featuring lesser condition vintage at fantastic prices. (Side note: they have a great selection of graded vintage on eBay too) 

  
I had about 90 minutes to spare on Thursday so I made the trip and went through a dozen boxes or so. The haul on this date wasn’t as heavy as usual, but I found some nice additions to my collection and some nice bargains that I couldn’t pass up.

We’ll start with a pair of vintage HOFers. Here is a 1969 Topps Deckle Carl Yastrzemski and a 1971 Topps Willie McCovey.  They present well for the price of $1 each.

  
I think this is the fourth 71 McCovey I own. Go figure.

I always wanted the 1952 Topps Gus Zernial card. I finally scored one at a good price. If you need to ask why I wanted it all you have to do is look at the picture.

  
As you know my big project is to obtain rookie cards of every guy who played on the Majors.  It’s a never ending task and an improbably goal.  But it does make things fun. Here’s a 1965 Topps high-number Frank Linzy and Bob Schroder rookie card.

 

Here’s the 1959 Topps rookie card of former Giants player and manager Felipe Alou.  It has a crease, but is centered nicely.  

 
I like the 1964 Topps set, especially the dual-player rookie cards. Here is one of solid Major Leaguer Rico Carty and counterpart Dick Kelley.

  
Every time I dig through these boxes I find myself stopping when I get to the 1960 Topps section.  I always pause when I see the rookie card of Frank Howard because I keep forgetting if I already owned it. Well, my online list didn’t show me owning the card of the 1960 National League Rookie of the Year so ai picked up this decent looking one for what I think was a good price.

  
About five years ago while attending the annual Tri-Star show at the Cow Palace in San Francisco I picked up a badly miscut copy of the 1973 Topps Dwight Evans rookie card for $5.  When I saw this nicely centered copy in Thursday for $6, I figured it was time for an upgrade. 

  
Sometimes a deal is just too good to pass up. True, I already own a 1957 Topps rookie card of Hall of Famer Bill Mazeroski. And yes, mine is in better shape. But I couldn’t resist buying this one … Even in its present condition.

  
Speaking of Hall of Famers, I found a BGS 4.5 1961 Billy Williams in the show case at a great price. 

  
There are three more cards that I purchased but none of them are vintage. But two of them were priced so well I couldn’t pass on them, and the other is of a guy who is having a breakdown-out season.

It’s hard to pass on a good-looking Derek Jeter rookie card at $4.  No obvious flaws anywhere.

  
There is zero chance I pass on one of the most iconic rookie cards of the early 1990s, the 1992 Bowman Mike Piazza, at this price … Even if there is some issue with one corner.

  
And lastly, just before ai checked out , I located a 2009 Bowman Chrome Draft Picks Dallas Kuechel in the showcase or $5.

  
It’s a little weird spending $5 for Kuechel considering that it was more expensive that the aforementioned Mazeroski, but when you see something you want/need you should pounce. Besides, it’s never a bad thing to support your local card shops. 

Icon-O-Clasm: Got ’em! Check! (1969 Topps Checklist / Mickey Mantle

Posted in Icon-O-Clasm with tags , , , , , , on November 18, 2014 by Cardboard Icons

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Tales from the Vintage Bargain Bins: 59 Topps Mantle, 68 Bench RC, more

Posted in Newspaperman, Vintage Bargain Bins with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 6, 2014 by Cardboard Icons

So in my previous post, I documented a sweet pull that came from a 2012 Panini America Signature Series pack. That pack came as an impulse buy after I spent an hour digging through the card shop’s Price Friendly Vintage boxes. It’s a great shop for vintage, and I used to go through these boxes more often. But in recent years I’d slowed down this hunt.

But there I was on Wednesday going through the boxes that I had not gone through in more than a year.

There were a couple high-dollar scores, some not-so-significant rookie cards I (think I) needed for my collection, and a few “different” types of cards that caught my attention.

On that note, let’s start with the “different” items.

I’m sure you’ve seen these before, but this is a 1965 Topps Embossed card of Ernie Banks. These were inserted into regular packs in 1965 and offered collectors a “different” type card of star players. There was a badly cut Roberto Clemente in the box for $5, but I liked the value on this Ernie Banks at $1. The card is scuffed and has a pin hole at the top, but it’s still worth 100 pennies to me.

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Here are a pair of 1969 Topps Sticker Albums. These also were inserted into packs and basically served as a place to put the player stickers that were also included in some packs. The albums are separated by team and show players inside with their stats. The albums I got are of the Houston Astros and Chicago Cubs. The Astros one doesn’t have any stickers, but the Cubs has a few, including Hall of Famer Fergie Jenkins. One a side note, the back side of these albums showcase facsimile signatures for players on the team. Surely that was a nifty idea for the time. These were 50 cents each.

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IMG_6901IMG_6900IMG_6903And here are a pair of 1970 Topps Booklets, one of Pete Rose and one of Ernie Banks. These are essentially comic books telling the career story of the depicted player. Kinda neat. Banks cost me $2; Rose was $2.50. Pretty good shape considering the card stock is thin like paper.

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IMG_6907IMG_6908And now some rookies:

We’ll start with a PSA 7 1981 Topps Jari Kurri rookie. I’m not big on hockey cards, but a PSA 7 for $3 seemed like a goo deal so I nabbed it.

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Speaking of graded. Here’s a 1981 Topps Harold Baines BGS 6 for $2. The grade is lower, but looking at the breakdown, the reason this got a 6 is because of the centering. Either way, I’ll pay $2 for older solid rookie cards in BGS slabs.

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And lower grades … here’s a creased 1992 Topps Derek Jeter rookie card for $2.50. Not exactly vintage, but it was in the box. I’ll bite at that price. It still presents nicely.

IMG_6913How about a 1967 Topps Sal Bando rookie card. I own one already, but this one looks a LOT better than the one in my collection.

IMG_6904Here’s the rookie card of 1970 American League batting champion Alex Johnson, 1965 Topps.

IMG_6905And the 165 Topps rookie card of Cleon Jones, a key member of the 1969 New York Mets championship run.

IMG_6909So, I went a good five years without acquiring a Bobby Cox rookie. And about a year or so ago, I found one in an antique store for just a few dollars. It’s a gorgeous card. During this trip I located another Cox rookie and it was $3. I like adding those kind of cards to my collection for the price of a pack of cards.

IMG_6906And now the three big purchases of the day.

We’ll start with a 1948 Bowman Marty Marion rookie. Truthfully, I have never seen one of these. This one is in good shape aside from the centering. Price $16. Not bad for a Hall of Famer.

IMG_6914 Creased cards get a bad wrap in our hobby. It’s almost the death of a card if it has been bended. That said, I can’t let a 1968 Topps Johnny Bench rookie card sit in this box for $9. Surely someone can appreciate just owning a Bench rookie. I already have a graded one, so this one will be made available at some point.

IMG_6898And now the main attraction. Remember what I said about creased cards? The crease in this 1959 Topps All Star Mickey Mantle card killed it’s value. But for $15 I cannot — nor shall anyone else — leave an authentic vintage card of perhaps the hobby’s biggest name in a box.

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A Mint Condition 1975 Topps George Brett rookie card

Posted in Icon-O-Clasm, Instagram Portraits with tags , , , , , on February 20, 2013 by Cardboard Icons

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