Topps Number Ones: 1952-2010

Update: 12/25/10

The “Topps Number Ones” is an on-going project to obtain the first card in each Topps set, beginning in 1952. This project began in December 2008 and was “completed” in December 2010. Additional cards will be added to the Project each year.

pafko

1952 Red Back

1953

1954

napt3d

1955

1956

1957

58twilliams

1958

1959

1960

1961

1962toppsrogermaris

1962

1963

1964

1965

1966

1967toppsworldchamps

1967

1968

1969

napt770mets

1970

1971

1972toppspirateschampions

1972

1973ToppsNo1RuthMaysAaron

1973

aaronhank74

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1980

10981ToppsNo1

1981

1982

1983

1984

1985

1986

1987topps1

1987

1988

1989

1990toppsnolanryan

1990

1991ToppsNolanRyan

1991

1992toppsnolanryan

1992

1993toppsrobinyount

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006toppsalexrodriguez

2006

2007toppsjohnlackey

2007

2008toppsalexrodriguez

2008

2009toppsalexrodriguez

2009

2010


6 Responses to “Topps Number Ones: 1952-2010”

  1. […] Another addition to my Topps Number Ones project. The card is horribly off-center, but you know I don’t mind much at this point. I […]

  2. I think one of the toughest #1’s to find in decent condition is the 1966 Willie Mays. When we are buiilding sets, that card always seems to be at least one condition lower.

    The 1952 Topps Pafko is tough, buy at least he was Pafko and not super star – which would have driven up the price.

  3. […] a good thing. But when I came across this card on eBay last week, I knew I had to have it for my Topps Number Ones […]

  4. […] Number Ones new additions As some of you know I’m working on a special project to obtain the first card from every Topps baseball set from 1952 through present. It’s a […]

  5. Over the course of 58 years you’d think Topps would’ve found a way to put Al Kaline #1. But that would be asking way too much, wouldn’t it.

  6. Great set! I like so many of them, so I’ll just mention a couple preferences and a couple dislikes. Starting the set with record breakers, highlights, league leaders and team cards (champions) is always a good thing to me. It emphasizes that the sets’ core purpose is to chronicle the season just completed. I prefer that approach over any attempt to preview the season to come because it avoids air-brushing, and because it’s more coherent than sets which capture some trades / free agents but ignore others.

    I have to mention a few that I really hate. Worst of all is the 1996. Why was that card even made? I also don’t like the 2010. Yes, it’s a regular player card, but it is among the most juvenile cards ever made.

    Generally, I’d like to see Topps abandon its practice of annointing a star for card #1. Topps has always had a credibility issue with their collation, so I’d like to see a more random distribution.

    Question…my 1999 Clemens has a reversed back; i.e., when you flip it to view statistics, his and a few others are upside down. I never knew whether there were correct variations of those cards. Does anyone know?

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