Two-time MLB Triple Crown Winner Rogers Hornsby added to the ‘Icons collection

Posted in Hall of Famers, New Addition with tags , , , , on October 8, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

This hobby is funny.  So many of us get caught up in the day-to-day grind of buying packs and looking for the good stuff, only to put stacks of cards away with the idea that we will sort them later. And we all know that rarely gets done as planned.

I’m now in the midst of what I’m calling the Great Purge of 2015, which is basically code for getting rid of almost all non-PC items. I did this once before in 2010 and ended up using the proceeds from the sale to buy a 1951 Bowman Mickey Mantle rookie card.

Well, I do have my eyes set on something big for my collection, but the other day I was thinking about the fact that I don’t have a single good card of Hall of Famer Rogers Hornsby in my collection.

I was eying a relic card, but what I really wanted was something old. Something that could eventually make its way into my showcase.

Hornsby’s first documented card was produced in 1917 and over the following decade and a half he had a few others produced, which made things tricky when it came to deciding which one I wanted to add to my collection. 

I had to decide between buying a card showcasing a artist rendition — a poor one at that — or Hornsby, or a card that showed a picture of him.

Ultimately I settled on this 1927 York Caramels card of Hornsby, which is one of the nicer and not-so-easy to find of his cards from his playing days

Do you realize that Hornsby not only won the Triple Crown, but he did it twice, one of only two players to achieve the feat more than once. The other guy was Ted Williams.  

Additionally, Hornsby finished his career 70 hits shy of the magical 3,000 mark, tallied a .358 career batting average, three times led the league in batting with an average over .400, and twice was voted the Most Valuable Player of his league.  Oh, and he wasn’t elected to the Hall of Fame until his fifth year of eligibility. Crazy. 

Thrift Treasures 97: A 92-year-old treasure from Treasure Island (San Francisco)

Posted in Thrift Treasures with tags , , , , on October 2, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

For years I had been hearing about a flea market on “Treasure Island,” which is a former Naval base located in the San Francisco Bay between the cities of San Francisco and Oakland. 

The family and I finally made our way up there and while the sports items are scant, I did manage to find a really near vintage card that was me less than two packs of cards.

It may be shaped like a used bar of soap, but I present to you a 1923 Zeenut Lawrence Robertson … In a picture frame.

Robertson played a single season of pro baseball with the Los Angeles Angels of the Pacific Coast League. In his one season he allowed 20 earned runs in 37 innings pitched. In short, he was not very good during this one and only season. 

Needless to say this Zeenuts card is his only card. And while this copy is cut to this shape and was still adhered to the paper in this picture frame, it’s still a really neat find at a price that is damn near unbeatable for a card almost a century old. 

Total cost of this treasure: $5

You can read more Thrift Treasures posts Here.

Baby born at San Diego’s Petco Park the second coming of “Prince?”

Posted in Card of the Day with tags , , , , , , , on September 27, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

Earlier this week there was a child born at San Diego’s Petco Park, the first to have come into the world at the Padres’ home stadium.

Surely this is not the first kid to be born at a stadium, but there was once a baseball player/entertainer who claimed to have been born in the same exact spot where “The House That Ruth Built” once stood in New York.

The man on this 1939 Play Ball card is Al Schacht, a former pitcher/coach/entertainer who thrilled crowds during the early part of the 1900s. And as it would have it, the rear of this card furthers Schacht’s claim to have been born where the original Yankee Stadium stood.  

Schacht was born in 1892, some 30 years before the original Yankee Stadium — which was demolished in 2010 — was erected at present day West 161st Street and River Avenue.  

Schacht spent much of his life in baseball, although he actually only played in the Majors for a handful of years with the Washington Senators. He’s better remembered as the “Crown Prince of Baseball,” due to his comedic acts on the field as a third base coach — nonsense that flew during the period but would have no place on the game today.

The child born this week in San Diego reportedly is a boy named Levi, who arrived just outside the gates of Petco Park during the fourth inning of a contest between the Padres and division rival San Francisco Giants.

In this piece at “The National Pastime” Schacht is documented as not only having been born where Yankee Stadium stood, but also notes that Schacht spent his youth sneaking into the Polo Grounds to hang out with players, particularly one Christy Mathewson. Mathewson of course pitched for the New York Giants, the team that ultimately would move to San Francisco, the same franchise that played in San Diego this week when baby Levi was born. 

Perhaps baby Levi is the second coming of Schacht and he was “sneaking” into Petco to see the Madison Bumgarner, the team’s modern day ace who just happened to be starting that game. 

(Side note: The NEW YORK Giants played the WASHINGTON Redskins on this night as well in a Thursday Night Football contest.)

Or maybe it’s just a coincidence.

Regardless, it’s a fun narrative to consider. After all, this is baseball. Romanticism is part of the lore of the American Pastime.

In Memoriam: Yogi Berra May 12, 1925-Sept. 22, 2015

Posted in In Memoriam with tags , , , on September 23, 2015 by Cardboard Icons


A trip to LCS for supplies leads to purchase of vintage rookies

Posted in Hall of Fame Rookie Cards, New Addition with tags , , , , , on September 21, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

So earlier today I was taking pictures of some autographs in my collection and noticed that I still needed about 30 single-screw cases for a project I’m working on.  So I headed to the LCS to buy these …

Well, I had about 20 minutes to spare and the shop owner tells me he got a bunch of 1940s and older cards in the showcase. 

So I dug through and saw lots of stuff I liked, but really two cards that I absolutely needed for my collection.

For less than the price of a hobby box I added two rookie cards of Boston Red Sox legends to my collection, cards that I had only seen online.  Both are considered lower grade, but I love that these were unexpected purchases made in person and from one of the local shops, which I like supporting. 

(Public Service Announcement: If you’ve got a shop near you, buy a single or two every month for your PC and help keep them in business.)

I only had a few minutes at the shop today because I had to get my kids from school, but I had just enough time afterward to take these Instagram pictures on the baseball field at my kids’ school.

1939 Play Ball Bobby Doerr, who at age 97 is presently the oldest living member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

 And 1941 Play Ball Dom DiMaggio, younger brother of The Yankee Clipper Joe DiMaggio, and a star in his own right.   

Icon-O-Clasm: Chan Ho Boom

Posted in Icon-O-Clasm with tags , , , , on September 20, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

Online breakers these days like to say “Boom” when they pull something significant.  Well, in 1994, if you were busting Ultra Series this was probably the best rookie insert possible.   

I manager to pull this tonight from a repack box at target.  Not exactly the object of my affection but a fun pull from a sealed pack of a product I wouldn’t even think about opening these days unless it was a bonus. 

Thrift Treasures 96: Vintage Gaylord and ‘Blue Moon’

Posted in Thrift Treasures with tags , , , , , , , on September 20, 2015 by Cardboard Icons

I love me some thrift store baggie’s full of cards.  I love it even more when at least one of the cards is already in some sort of protector.

Such was the case earlier this week when I saw this:

 I immediate saw this and snatched it off the leg hook. I recognized that as a 1965 Topps Gaylord Perry. Sure, I could buy the single almost anywhere for less than the $2.99 price tag on this bag, but this all goes back to the theme of the last “Thrift Treasures” post — principle. This is a third year card of a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, it should have never been in this situation. 

Once I opened the package I could see that the Gaylord was in pretty good condition other than the centering. 

At this point, everything else in the package was a bonus. Let’s have a look at what else was within.

I live in the San Francisco Bay Area. Some names still strike a cord with people out here. The aforementioned Perry is one. Another is Oakland A’s legend John “Blue Moon” Odom, a top pitcher for the club as Oakland won three consecutive World Series Titles from 1972 to 1974.

The Perry and Odom were the only true vintage cards, but there also were these early 1980s cards.

And nice 1985 Topps card commemorating Tony Perez’s grand slam in 1984,  which made him the oldest player to hit one.

A few other HOFers on some 1980s cards that aren’t as highly regarded.

And finally a few inserts. I LOVE the Topps Rookies glossy set, which were available only on rack packs. And anytime I locate an early Kevin Maas oddball card I usually buy it because of this story I wrote seven years ago.

Total cost of these Treasures: $2.99

You can read more Thrift Treasures posts here.


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