Archive for twitter

Twitter sale is reminder that “value” of cards varies from person to person

Posted in Misc. with tags , , , , , , , on January 23, 2019 by Cardboard Icons

For about a year I’ve had six 500-count boxes sitting on my card desk. The boxes contained partial baseball and football Topps sets from 1980-1985.

They were partial/starter sets I acquired with the intent to either 1) complete the sets, or 2) sell them to someone who needed them.

Well, they sat … and sat … and sat.

The mere sight of them often sent me into a tailspin as I could not muster the idea of spending an hour to determine what was there so I could post it on eBay with hopes that someone would take them off my hands. The resell value wasn’t nearly as good as I had hoped.

And then yesterday, after dropping off my kids at school, something clicked. Just get them out of the house, and reduce that stress.

So I spent 30 minutes counting the cards that we’re within and then offered the lots for sale on Twitter, which is sometimes hit and miss for sales on items that are not presently hot in our hobby.

For about 10 minutes the post sat. Then a follower of mine hit the DM and said he was interested.

This sale was confirmed and I was happy to hear the cards were going to a good home. What’s even better is the buyer advised they would essentially replace cards he lost in a flood some 30-plus years ago.

The economic value of the starter sets isn’t high — and the buyer understood that. The lots were void of the big star rookies and even the stars. But this also reset the notion of “value” for me a bit.

I had approached this the wrong way. I was looking at “value” based on what I saw on eBay, and the lack of “big payday” actually was hindering my process. Hell, at one point I was even regretting the purchase I made when I acquired these … because in some ways I had placed no value in the cards themselves because they no longer fit my collecting style.

But this transaction is a win-win for Scott (the buyer) and myself. Not only did I get the items out of my house and into a collector’s hands, but it was humbling and served a reminder that the value of our cards — while often tied to money — is often a personal experience.

One could look at these boxes as stacks of commons and donate them or toss them in the trash. Another could look at these partial sets and see potential, but then sit on then for years and gain stress from not moving them. And yet another person could look at the lot and see items representing a piece of their childhood.

The sale didn’t make me rich or even net me a profit; but it made me feel like I had made a giant sale as I had lightened my load and recouped a portion of what I spent on these cards and others.

Video Box Break: 1997 Topps Gallery Baseball

Posted in Box / Pack Break with tags , , , , , , , on November 4, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

After waiting more than two weeks for my box of 1997 Topps Gallery, the box arrived early Wednesday morning via FedEx. I broke it LIVE on steaming video. Images of the cards will be scanned and shown later. Over all a pretty cool box, hope you enjoy it.

[qik url=”http://qik.com/video/3432339″ width=”425″ height=”319″]

Also, there are a few other video breaks that can be seen at www.qik.com/cardboardicons. I recently broke a retail Blaster of 2009 SP Baseball (link), a Retail Tin of 2009 Sweet Spot baseball (link 1, link 2),  a discounted 2008 Stadium Club Blaster (link), and a 1996 Upper Deck Series 2. hobby box (link). And if you have not yet done so, you can follow me on Twitter at www.twitter.com/cardboardicons. I send out a tweet minutes before each LIVE video break.

Cardboard Icons is now on Twitter

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on August 1, 2009 by Cardboard Icons

I finally gave in. After fighting the urge to even get to learn Twitter, I had to open an account for work, so now I’ve done a personal one. Check me out at www.twitter.com/cardboardicons. I’ve actually come to like Twitter for quick hits. Sometimes I get a thought in my mind and am not in a place to blog it.